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As part of my immersion into fussball, bier, und wurst I've been trying to teach myself German via podcasts and apps.  My ultimate goal was to visit Germany sometime in the near future, hopefully next year, but it's all dependent on COVID, etc.  One observation I've had with the language are the articles.  I took years of Spanish in school and it was always easy to pick out the masculine/feminine nouns and assign the right articles.  They are killing me in German.  From what I have read that is one of the biggest complications for non-native speakers.  Not to mention that the article change depending on how nouns are used (der platz/uber den platz; mein sohn/meinen sohn).  I think I'm at the point where I can hold a basic conversation but to listen to someone speak (football player interviews for instance) are still way above my head.  Sie sprechen zu schnell!

Any similarities for Germans trying to learn English?

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I'm half German but barely spoke any German until my early teens; can very much relate to your struggle with der/die/das xD It gets easier with practice, but  after all these years, I'm still prone to mistakes every now and then, especially when I'm too tired. 

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1 hour ago, Coma said:

As part of my immersion into fussball, bier, und wurst I've been trying to teach myself German via podcasts and apps.  My ultimate goal was to visit Germany sometime in the near future, hopefully next year, but it's all dependent on COVID, etc.  One observation I've had with the language are the articles.  I took years of Spanish in school and it was always easy to pick out the masculine/feminine nouns and assign the right articles.  They are killing me in German.  From what I have read that is one of the biggest complications for non-native speakers.  Not to mention that the article change depending on how nouns are used (der platz/uber den platz; mein sohn/meinen sohn).  I think I'm at the point where I can hold a basic conversation but to listen to someone speak (football player interviews for instance) are still way above my head.  Sie sprechen zu schnell!

Any similarities for Germans trying to learn English?

Genuine question, did you have Roman Latin lessons at your school? If so, you'll find that the grammar is quite similar and helpful. By the way, many native English aren't aware how close their grammar really is. Two examples a Genitiv: it's my father, yet it isn't my father hat but my father's hat. b Dativ: it's a friend of mine, not a friend of my. As for the articles that's something just to be learnt by heart- us Germans are aware that's a pain in the ass for a lot of non-native speakers, though. Therefore nobody will bat an eyelid if you use the wrong one, good luck with your efforts. :)

As for my difficulties in English, they're mostly related to prepositions, actually I'm mostly guessing which one to use.xD 

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1 minute ago, Rucksackfranzose said:

Genuine question, did you have Roman Latin lessons at your school? If so, you'll find that the grammar is quite similar and helpful. By the way, many native English aren't aware how close their grammar really is. Two examples a Genitiv: it's my father, yet it isn't my father hat but ma Father's hat. b Dativ: it's a friend of mine, not a friend of my. As for the articles that's something just to be learnt by heart- us Germans are aware that's a pain in the ass for a lot of non-native speakers, though. Therefore nobody will bate an eyelid if you use the wrong one, good luck with your efforts. :)

As for my difficulties in English, they're mostly related to prepositions, actually I'm mostly guessing.xD 

I don't recall Latin being an option for me at school, at least not in what we call middle school.  I was introduced to French and Spanish in the 7th grade (age 13) and in the 8th grade we were able to pick one of those languages to progress in, so I chose Spanish as I figured it would be much more useful in the US than French would ever be.  By the time I reached high school I already had 2-3 years of Spanish so I didn't consider any other alternatives.

The examples you give of the English genitive/dative are interesting.  I guess you don't think about that when it's your muttersprache.... that's just how you learned it!

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Curious about umlauts... I don't have access to a German keyboard on my computer.  I read somewhere that if you don't have the umlaut key, just add an "e" after the letter... hence why I've used Koeln a few times.  Yes/no?

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3 minutes ago, Coma said:

Curious about umlauts... I don't have access to a German keyboard on my computer.  I read somewhere that if you don't have the umlaut key, just add an "e" after the letter... hence why I've used Koeln a few times.  Yes/no?

A big YES.

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The main thing to do is to accept that if you try - even if you get things wrong - people will respect you for the effort and the fact that trying to use their language is a way of respecting them.  Most of my German knowledge came from a combination of school and travelling often to stay with friends as a teenager and later.  If I get into a conversation on holiday with German holidaymakers they often ask which part of the Ruhr do I come from - usually my ne? gives it away, but they understand and - like nudge - I find they smile and accept that as a non-German I am expected to make a few errors - after all, English is probably the hardest language to conquer of all those that use the Arabic script - and if you don't believe that, try spending a few years with kids in school and see how long you can stay sane or even just calm.... There is always a way round the vocab with the use of small words put together rather than try and remember the big ones - in any case most big German words are combinations of groups of small ones. An English adjective plus noun is a combined pair and simply a noun in German and with the growth of the internet, German kids I have taught use the bad English words as normal part of the language - probably why DDW is not chastised today as he would have been ten years or more ago. Those with a normal second language ( kids like Mesut In Germany or young Kevin with both French and Flemish) find it easier and have  no self consciousness to try and speak a third one with less of a problem than their friends.  One of my classes in Batley, Yorkshire insisted that French was for 45 minutes of the hour and they would listen carefully if I agreed to spend the last 15 minutes learning Gujurati!   The fact that they spoke it but could not read it made it easier because we only used it that way - visits to France and Germany with kids was more useful in one week than a year in the classroom - now Internet TV gives you a great chance and watching the BL on Sky de or RMC will surprise you when you realise how much you are actually understanding and remember.  Try and use if for fun - my boys always remembered what the French word for a swimming pool was as they were told that it was the place where you should not do that! If you ever doubt the value of being able to use another language, just watch the kids faces when they arrive in Calais and immediately start to identify what the shops are selling 'cos they can read those funny words! As a final thought and question - which do you consider to be the most important words in German?  Try using weil without warum - it never stops like the crazy guy in the film  - and then... and then... an....

We never ever say goodbye or auf Wiedersehen - simply always a handshake or a high five and

sei nett!

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Rucksackfranzose said:

Ich warte immer noch auf die Kennerhinweise bezüglich unbekannter, aber lohnenswerter, Altbierbrauereien, die mir im "Glory hunter"-Faden, bei meiner kurzen Düsseldorfexcursion versprochen wurden. :(

Was war das nochmal genau? Hilf mir auf die Sprünge. Für Altbierbrauereien Expertisen in jeglicher Hinsicht stehe ich immer zur Verfügung. Oder ich muss selber mal im Ruhm Jäger-Faden nachschauen. xD

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7 minutes ago, Tommy said:

Was war das nochmal genau? Hilf mir auf die Sprünge. Für Altbierbrauereien Expertisen in jeglicher Hinsicht stehe ich immer zur Verfügung. Oder ich muss selber mal im Ruhm Jäger-Faden nachschauen. xD

Ne: ich kam irgendwie dazu Fortuna zu unterstützen, Du wolltest mich in der Stadt rumführen, worauf ich antwortete eine Einführung in unbekannte Altbierbrauereien, deren Produkt Freude beim Trinken bereitet sei völlig ausreichend. Du sagtest zu, das zu tun- ist aber nie erfolgt.

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1 minute ago, Rucksackfranzose said:

Ne: ich kam irgendwie dazu Fortuna zu unterstützen, Du wolltest mich in der Stadt rumführen, worauf ich antwortete eine Einführung in unbekannte Altbierbrauereien, deren Produkt Freude beim Trinken bereiten sei völlig ausreichend. Du sagtest zu, das zu tun- ist aber nie erfolgt.

Ich bin sehr gerne Fremdenführer in Düsseldorf, für jeden der aus diesem Forum mal in meiner Stadt landet! Einschließlich Altbierbrauereien Tour, wenn die Pest irgendwann mal vorbei ist. 

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11 hours ago, Tommy said:

Adipös ist humorös. 

 

11 hours ago, Tommy said:

Ich bin sehr gerne Fremdenführer in Düsseldorf, für jeden der aus diesem Forum mal in meiner Stadt landet! Einschließlich Altbierbrauereien Tour, wenn die Pest irgendwann mal vorbei ist. 

Sprechen Sie Englisch Sie zwei

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11 hours ago, Tommy said:

Ich bin sehr gerne Fremdenführer in Düsseldorf, für jeden der aus diesem Forum mal in meiner Stadt landet! Einschließlich Altbierbrauereien Tour, wenn die Pest irgendwann mal vorbei ist. 

Sag wann und ich werde versuchen dort zu sein!:hh:

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Ich muss mich heutzutage bei deutschen Übersetzungen auf Google verlassen. In meinen Armeetagen in Dortmund kamen ich und die Frau gut miteinander aus, aber das war 1972/75.

Edit: Google is not always reliable, in that sentence above I said me and the wife but it came out as I and the women :4_joy:

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Just now, SchalkeUK said:

Nicola is well known around here by that name! Especially when she keeps you all locked in while she keeps washing her hands of everything!

A politician I presume? got no time for them whatever part of the world they are in, they only look after themselves and fuck the general public. 

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