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SirBalon's: Knowing Men's Fashion Trends

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7 minutes ago, SirBalon said:

H&M are a Scandinavian company and to be honest they're the only Nordic clothing brand I know that manufactures way below the level you expect.  But they are a very low-cost brand and you can't expect miracles at that range.  What I will say is that for women they're ok but then again Primark make ok clothes for women and as a man you'd have to be off your nut to dress in that stuff.  The problem men have is that we need the quality of the clothing to be a certain level to fit well with the actual manufacturing of the cut not being so generic seeing as our bodies aren't as curved as women's... If you look at flatter taller women, they tend to buy more expensive clothes because the cheaper stuff doesn't fit well on them.

This is why I rate the Japanese brand UNIQLO so highly... Not only do they manage to keep costs so extremely low, but that they use high quality materials such as Pima Cotton which is something that only the high brands tend to use...  Plus their clothes are manufactured well which for example places like Primark, Next and H&M (to name a few) aren't...  Infact those three brands tend to use the same factories for some of their big selling mass produced garments.

Other non expensive brands where you get good quality are;

  • J CREW (these guys are a bit more expensive but of very high quality)
  • GAP
  • ZARA
  • MASSIMO DUTTI (for special occasion clothing)
  • UNIQLO

Completely agree, the women's stuff is generally better than men's which I noticed today whilst acting as human clothes hanger for the 7 different jumpers my girlfriend tried on. Out here you have shops called Cotton On and Factorie which are essentially like River Island, New Look, Topman etc. If you buy something from of those clothes and it's not a printed t-shirt (though I can't say I buy printed t-shirts) expect it to go down a size within your first wash. But other than that it generally feels cheap.

I'm a big fan of UNIQLO but I've not shopped there in a long time, bought some grey chinos, white Oxford Shirt and a blue dry lightweight seersucker jacket (or so their website said, it's probably the best blazer I've ever had), would like to when I can afford to be travels take precedent over clothes at the moment.

I managed to get some Timberland stuff (grey polo and a red/white chequered shirt) on the cheap about a year ago, still in good knick even if the shirt should probably have been a large instead of a medium.

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@Cannabis

Here's a few things I found although I haven't gone totally Autumn/Winter due to the strangely prolonged Summer we're getting in the UK... I've mixed it up for you a bit mate.

I've also tried to keep the price moderate.

 

Everyone needs to own a Cuban collared shirt in my opinion because it's probably the only short sleeved shirt that you can both wear casually and smart by always looking slick and confident.  The problem with Cuban collared shirts is that if you go for a really cheap one they tend to look awful and it's one of those things where you can really tell it's cheap!

This one is from Reiss and it's been reduced from £110 to £90

Couldn't copy and paste the image but here's the link:

https://www.reiss.com/p/cuban-collar-shirt-mens-guyver-in-white/?_$ja=tsid:|cid:1486220060|agid:59000199793|tid:pla-434403908290|crid:284418410294|nw:g|rnd:16447727492272929962|dvc:t|adp:1o2|mt:|loc:9045999&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI2P7qiLDQ3AIVxzobCh1VCAP-EAkYAiABEgKjxvD_BwE

 

Next, the chinos!  Chinos are back in massively (not that they were ever out of fashion) and it's good to invest in a good pair because they're great for both summer and the winter months!

These chinos (in navy blue because that colour is the most neutral in this trend) are from J Crew and they are top quality without paying 50% more from Ralph Lauren for example.  They're reduced from £68 to £48 right now! Great value for money considering the quality!

H7163_WX2279?$pdp_enlarge$

https://www.jcrew.com/uk/p/mens_category/pants/770/770-straightfit-lightweight-garmentdyed-stretch-chino/H7163?color_name=chrome

 

Next are shoes... I've gone for the Barcelona based shoe brand Camper because you're getting top quality for a decent price and they're also unique while maintaining all the trends!

The minimalist look is in fashion right now like for example your Adidas Stan Smith to name something everyone knows.  But be different, add style...

These are one of their latest models and are priced at £115. They're beautiful in my opinion and they'll go with anything from your chinos to jeans.  I like this colour but you can go all white if you like as its safer for some people... But this colour really is nice in my opinion.

K100397-007_F.jpg

https://www.camper.com/en_GB/men/shoes/pelotas/camper-pelotas_xlite-K100397-007

 

I'll add more things like t-shirts and stuff soon! ;)

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Young British up and coming fashion designers have joined up with their colleagues around our ancient continent and backed by Europe's big fashion houses on a unifying initiative to combat xenophobia and do battle against borders... In other words they want to make a statement with young people (and older if they're willing to join in)...

The initiative is to be all inclusive and not believe lies!

The until now ignored biometric electronic passport symbol (e-Passport) has been used cleverly with the even more smart slogan Legal Alien printed alongside. In other words, going Anti-Brexit

The first sweatshirt (image) is from the designer William Baker while the second one is from Bobby Abley. The third image is from this week's Paris Fashion Week using the power of suggestion where the media really take note.

They've been around for a bit testing it out but they're about to really push for it by the big high end fashion houses using it on their fashion week runways (catwalks) over the next two seasons.

 

LEGAL+ALIEN.jpg?auto=format&fit=max&h=10

67fb7c79d13f11d365295a05d26ffe20.jpg

aw18-trends-2.jpg

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1 minute ago, True Blue said:

Those look terrible mate, saying all that i don't wear tracksuits.

Casual sportswear (the once trend in the late 80s) is coming back thick and fast!  Also take into account that what high end fashion brands put out on their catwalks is always an artistic statement in haute-couture where the high-street brands then take note and mass produce.  It's a statement!  If you don't own a sweatshirt you're missing out mate and then the sportswear gear like tracksuit bottoms or jacket is already making it onto the street as can be observed around London.  Looks like Scousers are now gonna say they were right all along as they never gave up on the trend when it was deemed a heathen thing to do! :ph34r::eek:

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I do own a few mate, but wear them around the block. Wouldn't go to a night out in one, as those above are specialized just for that.

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21 minutes ago, True Blue said:

I do own a few mate, but wear them around the block. Wouldn't go to a night out in one, as those above are specialized just for that.

You're gonna be surprised during this Autumn/Winter season to see it all combined with chinos and denim in a manner to go out smart.  They've even been combining them with more casual men's suits on the catwalks. :o

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But the main issue with that initial post is the campaign on anti Brexit sentiments and the push for the public to make a statement.

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Balon, big fan of the Cuban shirt and chino combo, however would advise strongly against the sawn off Wellington boots.

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40 minutes ago, Danny said:

Balon, big fan of the Cuban shirt and chino combo, however would advise strongly against the sawn off Wellington boots.

I’m more a rugged jeans man myself but I am known amongst my circles to pull off a more suave sophisticated look every now and then. xD

Yeah... Got to love cuban collars on shirts for men. It’s the perfect excuse for a guy to have a legitimate reason to furrow his brows and pull off a crooked wry smile. B|

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11 hours ago, SirBalon said:

I’m more a rugged jeans man myself but I am known amongst my circles to pull off a more suave sophisticated look every now and then. xD

Yeah... Got to love cuban collars on shirts for men. It’s the perfect excuse for a guy to have a legitimate reason to furrow his brows and pull off a crooked wry smile. B|

I feel like your rugged jeans and wry smile is something that's reserved for @Storts

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terracemain5.jpg

The definitive guide to Terrace Fashion

& how to wear it

 

Ordinarily, getting kitted out head to toe in your most expensive clothing might be something you’d reserve for a date, a wedding or a black-tie event. However, if you were a devotee of terrace fashion, a matchday trip to the pub would be the only excuse you’d need to get yourself suited and booted.

Of course, by “suit” we mean a grand’s worth of designer Italian outerwear and by “boots” we’re referring to hen’s-teeth-rare Adidas trainers. Because the terrace lads’ definition of finery is a far cry from your standard Savile Rowtailoring.

Followers of this subcultural movement refer to themselves as “casuals”. To the layman, they’re football fans who choose to clad themselves in designer “casual” clothing rather than their team’s colours. In the early days of the late 1970s, this was done in order to more easily infiltrate rival firms for fights – something that has seen the term become synonymous with hooliganism and thuggery.

But not all casuals are or were hellbent on weekend, lager-fuelled barbarity. For many, their love for the scene revolves around the fashion and music. Scratch below the surface and you’ll find there’s more to terrace fashion than just flying fists and Stone Island logos. In fact, the scene has influenced modern menswear in ways you probably weren’t even aware of.

The Rise Of The Casuals

terracefash4.jpg

Terrace fashion has its roots in the late 1970s. The success of English football clubs saw young fans travelling overseas to Europe for matches and developing a taste for new and exotic sportswear in the process. They brought it back home, others saw and wanted it, and so the cycle began. This was really the beginning of hype sportswear.

The subculture developed its own uniform and a selection of core brands. “Farah, Lois, Diadora, Nike, Adidas, Puma, Sergio Tacchini, Fila, Ellesse, Cerutti 1881, Australian, Lacoste, Lyle and Scott, Pringle, Kappa,” says Neil Primett, owner of 80s Casual Classics, a dedicated casual shop that has supplied wardrobe to films such as The Firm, This Is England and The Business. “These are the labels that made up the outfit of your typical 1979-to-1985 casual.

“Exactly where it started is more difficult to say. I could not pin this on any one place.”

Many credit Manchester as the birthplace of terrace fashion, others namecheck Liverpool. Wherever it began, one thing was for certain: this new way of dressing was offering young, working-class men a space where they could engage with fashion.

“Then we got into one-upmanship,” says Primett. “It was all about who had the best and the latest gear. You might have started out wanting the best Patrick football boots to be like the best footballer. Next thing you know you were after the latest must-have Patrick cagoule. And so it continued.”

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The Evolution Of Terrace Fashion

The one-upmanship meant that terrace fashion evolved quickly, especially during the 80s. “The style changed rapidly and dramatically,” recalls Gary Aspden, a footwear designer and brand consultant for Adidas, and cult figure in terrace fashion. “It went from skin-tight jeans to flares to a tapered fit to a 501 fit to a loose, baggy fit – all in the space of a decade. It would literally change overnight. It was street fashion in the truest sense. You had to be part of it to keep up with it.”

terracefash8.jpg

During the 90s, cornerstone brands such as Sergio Tacchini and Fila gave way to the likes of Stone Island and CP Company. High-end names, such as Prada, Burberry, Aquascutum and Gucci also began to creep into the stands as casuals continued in their bid to outdo each other.

However, the constant peacocking wasn’t to last. The advent of new technology and online auctions saw previously rare items becoming more easily obtainable and the casual look plateaued. “The playing field is so different to how it was when I was a teenager,” says Aspden. “And that’s down to the internet.

“Nowadays casual style has a much more set look and whilst it still exists there isn’t the same urgency in the style one-upmanship that used to go on. The only two brands I can think of that had the longevity to maintain their relevance right the way through were Adidas and Lacoste.”

terracefash9.jpg

Terrace Fashion In Modern Menswear

Today, terrace fashion has swaggered out of the stands and into the mainstream. Brands that once had heavy links to football violence have shaken off those negative connotations and become more accessible. It’s the result of the casual look moving beyond its sports-tribe roots and becoming a lifestyle for style-conscious men.

It’s something that Aspden recognises from his work on Adidas’ Spezial line – a collection of clothing that has been bringing casual style to a wider audience. “With Spezial we acknowledged that there is a hardcore Adidas-dedicated audience here in the UK and across Northern Europe that has its roots in casual style and bears little relation the sneakerhead-hype-basketball-inspired sportswear culture that permeates the US.”

Music has also had a huge part to play in opening the casual uniform up to a wider audience. The advent of acid house in the late 1980s and early 1990s brought sportier styles and big logos into the spotlight, while artists such as Liam Gallagher, the Stone Roses and Kasabian have all played a part in keeping the style alive today.

terracefash11.jpg

Terrace Trainer Culture

The word “sneakerhead” probably isn’t something you’d tend to associate with the rain-battered terraces of English football clubs, but trainer culture is rife in this country thanks to the casuals. However, while traditional sneaker enthusiasts fawn over all things Nike and New Balance, for the terrace fashion set there’s only one brand worth striving for.

“Adidas has always made the best football products and for me that is at the root of it,” says Aspden. “Where I grew up, when the whole terrace thing kicked off in the late 1970s, it was young kids that adopted the brand’s football shoes as a fashion staple.”

Most of Aspden’s generation were introduced to Adidas footwear through football shoes like the Kick, the Mamba, the Bamba and the Samba. As the 1980s rolled on, all manner of Adidas styles became popular – not just football-inspired models. “We were wearing everything from tennis, running, training, indoor and even the leisure shoes that Adidas made at that time,” Aspden remembers. “There was also a huge subculture of kids travelling over to Switzerland, Austria and Germany to get hold of Adidas trainers that weren’t available in the UK.”

terracefash2.jpg

After spotting the demand, savvy retailers such as Liverpool’s Wade Smith and Manchester’s Oasis (not the band) circumvented the company and began importing Adidas shoes themselves. This opened things up to a wider audience and made copping rare trainers more manageable for UK enthusiasts, further cementing the brand with the three stripes as the go-to for casual footwear.

“I think most terrace lads like the simplicity of that Adidas aesthetic from the 70s and 80s,” Aspden adds. “Adidas footwear is synonymous with casual style in the same way that Doc Martens are synonymous with skinheads.”

It’s a trend as evergreen as Converse All-Stars, but even so, the modern obsession with retro sneakers has brought 80s and 90s styles back into fashion.

Key Pieces

The typical terracewear aficionado’s wardrobe will be packed to bursting point with expensive coats, technical jackets and rare trainers. However, the bulk of it can be divided up into seven distinct categories. These are the key styles you need to know about.

terracefash10.jpg

Mac

If you’ve ever been unfortunate enough to have seen Green Street, there are likely two things you remember about Charlie Hunnam’s football-firm-boss character. Number one: his shockingly badly acted Cockney accent. And number two: his pristine, Stone Island trench coat.

In the 1980s, casuals made a move toward British luxury brands, the two main ones being Burberry and Aquascutum. These two labels are known for producing some of the finest long-length outerwear and it wasn’t long before beige, knee-length coats were flooding football grounds.

In more recent years, the style has lost ground to more technical styles but still remains a cornerstone of casual culture.

terrace-fashion-1.jpg

Hooded Jacket

The north-west of England is arguably the spiritual home of terrace fashion. Rainy, outerwear-loving cities like Manchester and Liverpool gave rise to the casuals and as such, the scene’s affinity for anoraks and cagoules is deep rooted.

Terrace fashion is about two key things: who’s go the best clobber, and keeping the elements at bay while watching the match. This set of requirements has seen high-quality, high-end hooded jackets become the defining garment of the scene. Brands like Stone Island and CP Company have become the gold standards, but sailing and outdoor brands such as Henri Lloyd, Fjallraven and Paul & Shark are also popular.

terrace-fashion-2.jpg

Track Jacket

Before all the Aquascutum trench coats and CP Company goggle jackets, the humble track jacket reigned supreme in the casual’s wardrobe. This sporty, retro piece is still a common sight at matches today, but it was when fans started bringing tracksuits back from trips to Europe in the late 1970s that it really go a foothold in the subculture.

Italian brands like Sergio Tacchini, Ellesse and Fila soon came to define the look. The fact that these names weren’t available in the UK at the time only made them all the more appealing to young football fans keen to outdo one another in the fashion stakes.

terrace-fashion-3.jpg

Jeans

While corduroy trousers and even flares have enjoyed waves of popularity in terrace fashion, it’s straight-leg denim that has prevailed. Ever since the early days in Liverpool, jeans have ruled the roost and as the casual look continues to evolve, so does its followers’ taste in denim.

Traditionally, mid-wash and stonewash fabric from Emporio Armani was probably the most widely worn – almost an afterthought to an expensive jacket and nice pair of trainers. However, today’s terrace-fashion aficionados are more clued up on their weights and wefts, often opting for heavy, raw denim from dedicated brands like Edwin and Nudie.

terrace-fashion-4.jpg

Scarf

A multipurpose accessory, useful for both keeping the chill off on wintery terraces and obscuring faces before and after a post-match scuffle, the scarf is deeply entrenched into the casual way of life.

Often worn to cover the nose and mouth, checks and tartans are what it’s all about. British brands, such as Burberry, Aquascutum and Barbour are all popular choices and are still a common sight at football grounds today.

terrace-fashion-5.jpg

Cap

For those casuals intent on fighting, baseball caps have always provided another handy means of keeping their faces hidden from CCTV cameras and police patrols. This practical use has seen the cap permeate terrace fashion making it the headwear of choice for for both violent and peaceful terrace lads alike.

Again, Burberry is a favourite brand, due to its luxury price tag and distinctive all-over check branding. Meanwhile, Polo Ralph Lauren and Lacoste are solid options at the lower end of the price spectrum.

terrace-fashion-6.jpg

Trainers

Terrace fashion is probably at least fifty per cent about the trainers. Having the most sought-after kicks is a huge part of causal culture and although the Reebok Classic is a staple option, it’s Adidas that rules the roost as far as footwear is concerned.

Classics like the Gazelle and the Samba have remained popular over the years. But during the early years, young fans were often travelling back and forth to Germany to pick up rare models that couldn’t be found in the UK.

terrace-fashion-7.jpg

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So now you're recommending that we dress like chavs? 

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15 minutes ago, Tommy said:

So now you're recommending that we dress like chavs

Its ironic that a person who rarely wears clothes at all is recommending others what to wear :ph34r:

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1 hour ago, Tommy said:

So now you're recommending that we dress like chavs? 

That’s not actually “Chav” but I get it and it’s funny. xD

There are always moments for all sorts of dress codes and this one although I wouldn’t wear it in its fullest version, there are parts to it I’ve always loved like the track tops and the trainers. 

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7 hours ago, Danny said:

Last picture, bottom left. Horrifying.

Do you mean the sky blue Adidas Spezial?

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1 hour ago, SirBalon said:

Do you mean the sky blue Adidas Spezial?

Horrifying is a better description mate

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Just now, Danny said:

Horrifying is a better description mate

xD

To be honest that colour is probably the most difficult to match with your usual options above your feet.  But these days conflicting colours seem to be something chosen by your twenty-somethings.

To be honest it's all about age with these things as for example in my case as a 40 something those types of Adidas trainers don't suit me as well as your typical dad trainers which are your New Balance or Nike Internationals.

Above all else with fashion it's what you feel comfortable in because like everything, it's a state of emotions which drives humans to feeling confident.

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Henry-Hales-Sir-Plus.jpg?fit=620,382

Henry Hales

and the story of

SIR PLUS

 

The world has heard of SirBalon but let me tell you guys of the story of another unsuspecting Knight of the Realm in the shape of Henry Hales who with hard work and a vision turned into SirPlus...

I met him yesterday through a friend at work who is in the fashion industry and he told me he had a very interesting individual he was going to be speaking to for a piece he was writing.  I won't go into everything (extremely interesting) I listened to because I don't want to undermine the work my friend is doing so I've just taken Henry Hales' story from his website which is interesting enough although doesn't tell half the story as you can imagine.  A very very very nice guy is Henry Hales!


2010
Sir Plus is founded by Henry Hales. While plotting to take over the men’s underwear market, Henry leads to a chance discovery: that shirt-makers often end up with a surplus of fabric, not enough to make a shirt but plenty for a few pairs of boxers. Said fabric is snapped up, boxer shorts are made, and a pun-tastic name is given.

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2010
Sir Plus meets the world! Henry moves to London armed with suitcases of boxers, and heads straight for east London’s Spitalfields market sure of success. On day one, his takings total £0. Day one is a fluke as it turns out, Henry soon makes the pilgrimage west to Portobello, and word of mouth begins to spread.

1jpeg-1537353774162.jpeg

2011
The Sir Plus website launches, complete with questionable cabbage logo. Years later and we're still asked about the reasoning behind this – the simple answer is that cabbage is industry-speak for surplus. As for the top hat – we’ll get back to you.

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2011
From boxer shorts, the logical next step is, of course, formal waistcoats. Made from surplus and fitted in Henry's front room (a spacious east London studio is still a few years away at this point), they quickly grow in popularity. Nehru waistcoats come next, kick-starting a collarless complex still evident today.

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2014
An upgrade, from trestle table to custom-built market cart. By now Sir Plus is a regular fixture on Portobello Market, with a regular spot outside of No. 306A.

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2016
Our first magazine cover. A lesser-known tennis player is drafted in to wear our Nehru jacket, but of course, the focus is firmly on Sir Plus.

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2016
The shop on wheels arrives: a custom-built, state-of-the-art rolling store, made possible due to the massive generosity of friends and family. Over £19,000 is raised via a Kickstarter, which remains humbling to this day. A huge thank you continues to go out to each and every one of the 166 who contributed.

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2017
Our distribution centre opens, allowing us to pick, pack and post orders faster than ever before. Never again will Henry get stuck on a lawn while hand-delivering a package, disturbing a rather grand Christmas party in the process. Orders are now expertly shipped anywhere in the world within four days, with next working day delivery available throughout the UK.


05_sirplus331jpg-1537357181884.jpg

 

November 2017
We're handed the keys to 306A Portobello Road, after years of pitching on the market directly in front. It's a small, unassuming place, but one with more than enough room for our full collection which by now includes jackets, trousers, coats, knitwear and more.


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February 2018
The team behind Brooklyn Flea Market, New York's answer to Portobello, invite Sir Plus to join them for a one-off weekend. While there, we also run a special trunk show with our friends Turnbull & Asser. The special relationship is forged as we introduce our American cousins to the Nehru collar and grandad shirt.

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September 2018
49 Camden Passage in Islington opens its doors. Five miles east and ever so slightly north of Portobello, it's a bright and spacious store which counts among its neighbours a delectable Austrian cafe, an uproarious comedy club, and on Wednesdays and Saturdays a brilliant antiques market.

camdenjpg-1537364314861.jpg

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How much do the boxers cost? I'm expecting you to say about £500. Anything less and I'd be disappointed. 

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8 minutes ago, Stan said:

How much do the boxers cost? I'm expecting you to say about £500. Anything less and I'd be disappointed. 

Hahaha

More or less your Calvin Klein prices which range between £25 to £30. Not bad for quality!

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Just now, SirBalon said:

Hahaha

!ore or less your Calvin Klein prices which range between £25 to £30. Not bad for quality!

Goes back to other debates we've had where you can get equal quality for less :/ 

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Just now, Stan said:

Goes back to other debates we've had where you can get equal quality for less :/ 

Doubt that very much where less is concerned (price).  You can get decent stuff but not this meticulous care for what you're purchasing.

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Just now, Panna King said:

@SirBalon

I am going out tonight tonight with Mrs Pannaking

 

I am thinking of a Smart Casual what do you think?

full.jpg

 

 

 

Very Spanish that!

Love the sand boots especially with the indigo blues contrasting with pure white being a winner.  You could be going back home with more than just Mrs Pannaking! xD

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2 minutes ago, SirBalon said:

Very Spanish that!

Love the sand boots especially with the indigo blues contrasting with pure white being a winner.  You could be going back home with more than just Mrs Pannaking! xD

:twothumbsup: 

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1 minute ago, Panna King said:

:twothumbsup: 

To be honest, I love those sand boots!!!

Where did you get the picture from, does it say who makes them?

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