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Susanna Dinnage Replaces Richard Scudamore as Premier League Chief Exec


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https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/46200473

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Susanna Dinnage has been named as the new chief executive of the Premier League, replacing Richard Scudamore.

Dinnage joins from media organisation Discovery, where she was the global president of the Animal Planet channel.

Scudamore, 59, is stepping down next month after 19 years at the organisation.

"I am excited at the prospect of taking on this fantastic role. The Premier League means so much to so many people," Dinnage said.

"It represents the pinnacle of professional sport and the opportunity to lead such a dynamic and inspirational organisation is a great privilege.

"With the support of clubs and the team, I look forward to extending the success of the league for many years to come."

 

 

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Susanna Dinnage has been confirmed as the Premier League's new chief executive, succeeding Richard Scudamore from early 2019.

The decision comes after Scudamore decided to step down following nearly 20 years at the top of an organisation whose commercial template has become admired by sports rights-holders around the world.

Dinnage, commenting on her appointment, told the Premier League's website: "I am excited at the prospect of taking on this fantastic role.

"The Premier League means so much to so many people. It represents the pinnacle of professional sport and the opportunity to lead such a dynamic and inspirational organisation is a great privilege.

"With the support of clubs and the team, I look forward to extending the success of the League for many years to come."

A five-person panel, led by the Chelsea chairman Bruce Buck, was tasked with recommending a preferred candidate to a meeting of Premier League clubs this month.

"We are very pleased to appoint such a capable leader to this important role," Buck said of the appointment.

"We had a very strong field, but Susanna was the outstanding choice given her track record in managing complex businesses through transformation and digital disruption."

Scudamore has combined the roles of chairman and chief executive for the last four years.

The Premier League is now expected to begin looking for a new non-executive chairman.

Scudamore insisted the league will continue to attract fans around the world under "new and re-invigorated leadership".

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2 minutes ago, Bluebird Hewitt said:

And the BBC has once again shows the hatred for Cardiff City, saying that 'we support the £5m bonus'. 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/46209165

Funny how the article doesn't mention any of the other 14 clubs that supported it. Biased cunts.

Or maybe your Chief Exec is the only one that's come out and said anything on it?

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Susanna Dinnage: The 10 challenges facing the new Premier League boss

By Dan Roan

BBC sports editor

1 hour ago | Premier League

TV executive Susanna Dinnage will soon become the first female chief executive of the Premier League, taking up her role in the new year. But what will be top of her in-tray? BBC sports editor Dan Roan takes a closer look.

 

Super League breakaway

Amid renewed talk of a possible breakaway to form a European Super League, and recent pressure from the biggest clubs for a greater share of the overseas TV rights revenue, one of Dinnage's biggest tasks will be to keep the league together and maintain the collective-selling strategy that has proved so successful.

The 'Big Six' - Manchester United, Manchester City, Liverpool, Chelsea, Arsenal, and Spurs - got their way in June, and proceeds from international broadcasters will now be distributed according to league position, but that is unlikely to satisfy the clubs' overseas billionaire owners long-term.

Brexit

The Premier League has been in negotiations with the government to secure an exemption that would not just allow freedom of movement for European players after Brexit, but even remove restrictions on permits for all overseas footballers offered a contract.

But in return for this, the Football Association wants a significant increase in the minimum number of homegrown players that have to be in any squad, using it as an opportunity to boost the presence of British talent, something which could cause friction with the clubs. Negotiations are at a delicate stage.

TV deals

Dinnage's experience as a TV executive should equip her for the all-important negotiations with broadcasters for the rights deals that have transformed the Premier League into one of the world's richest sports leagues, and a commercial phenomenon over the last quarter of a century.

The most recent domestic live TV deal suffered a significant dip in value, however, and amid changing audience habits, the rise of social media and online viewing, and new digital challenges to the established duopoly of Sky and BT, brokering new partnerships with media organizations could be her number one priority.

As well as being exceptionally well-connected in the media industry, Dinnage has already shown she is a tough negotiator, standing up to Sky - (which has enjoyed a vastly lucrative relationship with the Premier League since its creation in 1992) - and threatening to pull 12 Discovery channels from its platforms in 2017 in a dispute over fair pricing, before reaching a deal.

Her familiarity with former Discovery colleague and ex-Eurosport chief Peter Hutton, now head of sport at Facebook, could also prove useful if the digital giant looks to acquire Premier League football rights like Amazon already has.

Grassroots

The collapse of the FA's proposed sale of Wembley to Shahid Khan and with it a £600m windfall for the country's dilapidated grassroots facilities, put renewed focus on whether the Premier League should contribute more of its vast wealth to the hard-up amateur game, where many matches are canceled each winter because of the state of grass pitches and a lack of 3G alternatives.

Dinnage will be made aware by her new staff that the organization already gives a £24m annual contribution to the Football Foundation, part of a wider £100m-per-season investment in community facilities, sports participation programmes, and education projects. But she may well come under renewed pressure from politicians, the media and the public to share even more.

Fan relations

Some of football's traditional match-going fans, often annoyed by the way fixtures are moved to suit broadcasters' schedules, will be concerned at the appointment of a media executive rather than a figure from the football industry. And part of Dinnage's challenge will be to convince the wider footballing public that they matter to her and the clubs, and will not be exploited or priced out of the game.

Dialogue with the Football Supporters Federation - which is merging with Supporters Direct - will be important.

Safeguarding and Player-welfare

Dinnage will be at the Premier League helm when the FA's long-awaited independent inquiry into the historical child sex abuse scandal that rocked the sport over the last two years is finally published.

Leading the clubs' response to any criticism or recommendations will be a major challenge and one on which she will be judged. As well as safeguarding, there is also renewed scrutiny on the top clubs' record when it comes to anti-discrimination, inclusion, a duty of care towards trainees and players rejected by academies, mental health and the management of head injuries.

Agents

More money is going into agents' pockets than ever before in English football, with Premier League clubs paying them £211m in the past year, an increase of £37m, and officials seem intent on a crackdown, aware that the exorbitant fees do little for the clubs' reputation among the public.

Dinnage will be at the heart of the drafting of new regulations and will need to work closely with the FA and Fifa on the issue.

Safe-standing

Dinnage will want to contribute to the government's review of the ban on standing at Premier League matches, a policy that has not been reviewed since 1992. The ban was imposed following the recommendation of Lord Justice Taylor in his second report into the 1989 Hillsborough disaster and has been the subject of fierce debate from both sides.

In the summer, the man she will replace, Richard Scudamore, said each club should be allowed a choice as to whether to introduce safe-standing, but a final decision on this highly emotive issue is still some way off.

Gambling

Nine of the Premier League's 20 clubs have gambling companies on their shirts this season, and there is a growing debate about the close relationship between football and the betting industry.

If there is a change in government, this could become a major priority for Dinnage, with Labour calling for a ban on gambling advertising during live sporting events and threatening to take legislative action to force clubs to end sponsorship deals with betting firms.

Talking of sponsors, it will be interesting to learn what Dinnage makes of Der Spiegel's recent revelations about Manchester City and allegations that the club deceived Uefa over the value of its sponsorship contracts to get round Financial Fair Play regulations.

VAR

After being used relatively successfully at the World Cup in Russia, and following trials at simultaneous matches in England, clubs could soon vote to fully introduce Video Assistant Referees (VAR) next season, by which time Dinnage will have settled into her new role. Overseeing the bedding-in of what will inevitably be a controversial new system will be another challenge.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/46205500

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The idea that each club should give that kind of financial gift to someone who was paid very handsomely in the 19 years he was the PL chairman is mental. A big financial gift like that should be split among all the stewards and ballboys, local charities, and grassroots football. Not just give a man who was already paid really well one last big payoff. 

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Glad we were one of the clubs to reject it:

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Leicester fury at 'arbitrary and excessive' £5 million farewell for Richard Scudamore
DAN KILPATRICK 
2 hours ago 

Each of the 20 clubs agreed to pay £250,000 to the outgoing Premier League chief.

Leicester are the first Premier League club to break ranks over Richard Scudamore’s £5million golden handshake, describing the gesture as “arbitrary and excessive”.

Each of the 20 clubs agreed to pay £250,000 to the outgoing Premier League chief — sparking a furious backlash from fans.

The bonus, to be spread over three years, was not put to a vote and it is thought a number of clubs, including the Foxes, opposed it at yesterday’s meeting.

“Leicester City are against making such an arbitrary and excessive payment,” a senior club spokesperson said.


“We are not questioning Richard Scudamore’s incredible contribution to the Premier League, but a £5m bonus is not the best way to appropriate these funds.”

The decision to reward Scudamore, who earns £900,000-a-year plus a £1.6m annual bonus, for his 19-years at the Premier League was spearheaded by Chelsea chairman Bruce Buck.

 

Believe Fulham and Watford are two of some other clubs to be angry at it too. The fact there was no vote is disappointing too.

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On 14/11/2018 at 13:44, CaaC - John said:

Susanna Dinnage: The 10 challenges facing the new Premier League boss

By Dan Roan

BBC sports editor

1 hour ago | Premier League

TV executive Susanna Dinnage will soon become the first female chief executive of the Premier League, taking up her role in the new year. But what will be top of her in-tray? BBC sports editor Dan Roan takes a closer look.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

 

Super League breakaway

Amid renewed talk of a possible breakaway to form a European Super League, and recent pressure from the biggest clubs for a greater share of the overseas TV rights revenue, one of Dinnage's biggest tasks will be to keep the league together and maintain the collective-selling strategy that has proved so successful.

The 'Big Six' - Manchester United, Manchester City, Liverpool, Chelsea, Arsenal, and Spurs - got their way in June, and proceeds from international broadcasters will now be distributed according to league position, but that is unlikely to satisfy the clubs' overseas billionaire owners long-term.

Brexit

The Premier League has been in negotiations with the government to secure an exemption that would not just allow freedom of movement for European players after Brexit, but even remove restrictions on permits for all overseas footballers offered a contract.

But in return for this, the Football Association wants a significant increase in the minimum number of homegrown players that have to be in any squad, using it as an opportunity to boost the presence of British talent, something which could cause friction with the clubs. Negotiations are at a delicate stage.

TV deals

Dinnage's experience as a TV executive should equip her for the all-important negotiations with broadcasters for the rights deals that have transformed the Premier League into one of the world's richest sports leagues, and a commercial phenomenon over the last quarter of a century.

The most recent domestic live TV deal suffered a significant dip in value, however, and amid changing audience habits, the rise of social media and online viewing, and new digital challenges to the established duopoly of Sky and BT, brokering new partnerships with media organizations could be her number one priority.

As well as being exceptionally well-connected in the media industry, Dinnage has already shown she is a tough negotiator, standing up to Sky - (which has enjoyed a vastly lucrative relationship with the Premier League since its creation in 1992) - and threatening to pull 12 Discovery channels from its platforms in 2017 in a dispute over fair pricing, before reaching a deal.

Her familiarity with former Discovery colleague and ex-Eurosport chief Peter Hutton, now head of sport at Facebook, could also prove useful if the digital giant looks to acquire Premier League football rights like Amazon already has.

Grassroots

The collapse of the FA's proposed sale of Wembley to Shahid Khan and with it a £600m windfall for the country's dilapidated grassroots facilities, put renewed focus on whether the Premier League should contribute more of its vast wealth to the hard-up amateur game, where many matches are canceled each winter because of the state of grass pitches and a lack of 3G alternatives.

Dinnage will be made aware by her new staff that the organization already gives a £24m annual contribution to the Football Foundation, part of a wider £100m-per-season investment in community facilities, sports participation programmes, and education projects. But she may well come under renewed pressure from politicians, the media and the public to share even more.

Fan relations

Some of football's traditional match-going fans, often annoyed by the way fixtures are moved to suit broadcasters' schedules, will be concerned at the appointment of a media executive rather than a figure from the football industry. And part of Dinnage's challenge will be to convince the wider footballing public that they matter to her and the clubs, and will not be exploited or priced out of the game.

Dialogue with the Football Supporters Federation - which is merging with Supporters Direct - will be important.

Safeguarding and Player-welfare

Dinnage will be at the Premier League helm when the FA's long-awaited independent inquiry into the historical child sex abuse scandal that rocked the sport over the last two years is finally published.

Leading the clubs' response to any criticism or recommendations will be a major challenge and one on which she will be judged. As well as safeguarding, there is also renewed scrutiny on the top clubs' record when it comes to anti-discrimination, inclusion, a duty of care towards trainees and players rejected by academies, mental health and the management of head injuries.

Agents

More money is going into agents' pockets than ever before in English football, with Premier League clubs paying them £211m in the past year, an increase of £37m, and officials seem intent on a crackdown, aware that the exorbitant fees do little for the clubs' reputation among the public.

Dinnage will be at the heart of the drafting of new regulations and will need to work closely with the FA and Fifa on the issue.

Safe-standing

Dinnage will want to contribute to the government's review of the ban on standing at Premier League matches, a policy that has not been reviewed since 1992. The ban was imposed following the recommendation of Lord Justice Taylor in his second report into the 1989 Hillsborough disaster and has been the subject of fierce debate from both sides.

In the summer, the man she will replace, Richard Scudamore, said each club should be allowed a choice as to whether to introduce safe-standing, but a final decision on this highly emotive issue is still some way off.

Gambling

Nine of the Premier League's 20 clubs have gambling companies on their shirts this season, and there is a growing debate about the close relationship between football and the betting industry.

If there is a change in government, this could become a major priority for Dinnage, with Labour calling for a ban on gambling advertising during live sporting events and threatening to take legislative action to force clubs to end sponsorship deals with betting firms.

Talking of sponsors, it will be interesting to learn what Dinnage makes of Der Spiegel's recent revelations about Manchester City and allegations that the club deceived Uefa over the value of its sponsorship contracts to get round Financial Fair Play regulations.

VAR

After being used relatively successfully at the World Cup in Russia, and following trials at simultaneous matches in England, clubs could soon vote to fully introduce Video Assistant Referees (VAR) next season, by which time Dinnage will have settled into her new role. Overseeing the bedding-in of what will inevitably be a controversial new system will be another challenge.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/46205500

 

On 13/11/2018 at 22:22, Stan said:

Just beat you to it by about 5 and a half hours @The Palace Fan :P 

 

On 13/11/2018 at 22:31, The Palace Fan said:

The shock of someone else creating a thread ^_^

Shit, just realized I had posted it after too, and I laughed at your comments also @Stan     :dam:

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1 hour ago, Cannabis said:

Completely understand the smaller clubs being outraged at the £250,000 donation as it will seriously hamper next year's transfer budget, arguably the most important time of a clubs year. 

Tbf I'd be surprised if Everton gave it, one of the most prominent clubs in the creation of the Premier League only for a total fall from grace and now an also ran. Didn't quite work out how Everton expected I think.

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Just now, Cannabis said:

I take it you're on the ale?

No, what do you disagree with of what I've said? A lot of time for Everton generally but their greed along with Liverpool, Manchester United, Arsenal and Spurs basically resulted in the Premier League. Everton stupidly assumed they'd remain near the top of the pecking order but it didn't work out.

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5 minutes ago, Cannabis said:

"and now an also ran". 

Assumed you were either on the ale, or your English isn't your strongest suit which I have noticed in previous posts. 

Very happy with how Everton are being run to be honest. Hull Tigers however I'd argue the opposite.

You are. You can't argue otherwise with any degree of intelligence (maybe the sounder Evertonians on here can help you out).  I personally regard Everton as a big club but they've become a symbol of mediocrity, a flotsam and jetsam club, left behind by the two genuine behemoths (Liverpool and Manchester United) an English Giant (Arsenal) and two fraudsters (Chelsea and Manchester City). Just a reminder that Everton played their own greedy role in all of this.

Edited by The Artful Dodger
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On 14/11/2018 at 18:46, Dr. Gonzo said:

 

The idea that each club should give that kind of financial gift to someone who was paid very handsomely in the 19 years he was the PL chairman is mental. A big financial gift like that should be split among all the stewards and ballboys, local charities, and grassroots football. Not just give a man who was already paid really well one last big payoff. 

Couldn't have said it better myself.... takes the piss really

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  • 1 month later...

Susanna Dinnage changes mind on Premier League chief executive role

By Dan Roan

BBC sports editor

44 minutes ago | Football

The Premier League says its prospective new chief executive, Susanna Dinnage, has told the organization she will not be taking up the position.

Dinnage was named as the replacement for the Richard Scudamore in November and was supposed to take up the role early in 2019.

"The committee has reconvened its search and is talking to candidates," said a Premier League statement.

"There will be no further comment until an appointment is made."

Dinnage was supposed to join from media organization Discovery, where she was the global president of the Animal Planet channel.

However, she had reflected on the role in recent weeks and informed the Premier League that she had decided that she wanted to stay in broadcasting at Discovery.

She apparently had not given a precise start date as she had a long notice period to serve.

The Premier League is comfortable with acting chief executive Richard Masters and interim chair Claudia Arney continuing for longer as they resume their search.

Prior to joining Discovery in January 2009, Dinnage worked for 10 years at Channel Five and she started her career at MTV.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/46718143

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