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On 26/02/2020 at 11:16, Eco said:

I saw a headline of an article about this girl who is being labeled as the 'Anti Greta'. I think she's German? 

Seems a bit weird, tbh. Did you know she's paid by a US think tank? It's like they saw that the media reacted positively to a kid talking about climate change, so they figured "if kids are what they want, kids are what we'll give 'em" and they've paid this kid to come speak out about what they call "climate realism."

Still doesn't change the fact that one side has science on their side and the other doesn't, though, regardless of whether they've got a bizaro-Greta.

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It's so hard but at the same time so easy to predict the way climate change is used as political ping pong by middle aged, generally right leaning politicians.

I don't understand how people can have a problem with Greta Thunberg. How dare she, a young, female person who is incredibly knowledgeable on the subject, have the gall to think she knows better than Dave down the pub who says it's all a conspiracy made up by erm.... to err.... what's the excuse again?

In typical human fashion, we will only start making major changes to our lifestyle when we've realised it's too late.

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I do wonder if it is better to give deniers some air time? Put them up against scientists so there arguements can be beaten one by one 

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1 hour ago, RandoEFC said:

It's so hard but at the same time so easy to predict the way climate change is used as political ping pong by middle aged, generally right leaning politicians.

I don't understand how people can have a problem with Greta Thunberg. How dare she, a young, female person who is incredibly knowledgeable on the subject, have the gall to think she knows better than Dave down the pub who says it's all a conspiracy made up by erm.... to err.... what's the excuse again?

In typical human fashion, we will only start making major changes to our lifestyle when we've realised it's too late.

It’s just this battle of left vs right, I think most people caught up in it would have a lot of similar views but then they see this argument and they take a side and then everything is amplified beyond recognition. There is no logical reason to dislike Greta if you’re not profiting from the current system, the abuse people give her for being a girl and autistic just sums up the level of ignorance in the debate 

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3 minutes ago, Gunnersauraus said:

I do wonder if it is better to give deniers some air time? Put them up against scientists so there arguements can be beaten one by one 

This is exactly the problem though. When you put experts in a debate against morons as equals in the name of "impartiality" you aren't giving anyone watching it the true story because we're in a place where everyone's opinion has to be treated as equally valid even if one side is backed up by mounds of factual evidence and the other is there to seek attention, be controversial or to sell denial to the droves of other morons out there that lap it up.

Like it or not, 90% of people are exactly that, morons, and if you put a Harvard-educated climate scientist with a PhD on Sky News to debate climate change with a 45 year old, Tommy Robinson sympathising closet racist with a regional accent who doesn't even have the intelligence or self-awareness to understand that the real reason why he's so angry about Greta Thunberg is because she's a young girl with a disability who has achieved more at the age of 17 than he will in his lifetime, then that 90% of idiots are going to be drawn to the one they sympathise with the most. This is how we end up with Trump, Brexit and, well, climate change deniers.

We're all human though. Our base instincts tell us to choose to feel better about ourselves for the next five minutes rather than reflect on our mindset and change our behaviour for long-term benefit.

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12 minutes ago, Gunnersauraus said:

I do wonder if it is better to give deniers some air time? Put them up against scientists so there arguements can be beaten one by one 

This happens with racism and it just legitimises racism as a stand point. Look at the support Lawrence Fox received for being a dildo on national television 

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Climate change boosted Australia bushfire risk by at least 30%

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Scientists have published the first assessment quantifying the role of climate change in the recent Australian bushfires.

Global warming boosted the risk of the hot, dry weather that's likely to cause bushfires by at least 30%, they say.

But the study suggests the figure is likely to be much greater.

It says that if global temperatures rise by 2C, as seems likely, such conditions would occur at least four times more often.

The analysis has been carried out by the World Weather Attribution consortium.

FULL REPORT

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Just a week of lock down and pollution goes down, natural habitat coming back to life. It's all about greed and unrestricted production and consumption.

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Climate change: Earth's deepest ice canyon vulnerable to melting

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East Antarctic's Denman Canyon is the deepest land gorge on Earth, reaching 3,500m below sea-level.

It's also filled top to bottom with ice, which US space agency (Nasa) scientists reveal in a new report has a significant vulnerability to melting.

Retreating and thinning sections of the glacier suggest it is being eroded by encroaching warm ocean water.

Denman is one to watch for the future. If its ice were hollowed out, it would raise the global sea surface by 1.5m.

"How fast this can happen? Hard to say, since there are many factors coming into play, for example, the narrowness of the channel along which Denman is retreating may slow down the retreat," explained Dr Virginia Brancato, from Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a former scholar at the University of California at Irvine (UCI).

"At present, it is critical to collect more data, and closely and more frequently monitor the future evolution of the glacier," she told BBC News.

FULL REPORT

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Great Barrier Reef suffers third mass bleaching in five years

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Australia's Great Barrier Reef has suffered another mass bleaching event - the third in just five years.

Warmer sea temperatures - particularly in February - are feared to have caused huge coral loss across the world's largest reef system.

Scientists say they have detected widespread bleaching, including extensive patches of severe damage. But they have also found healthy pockets.

Two-thirds of the reef was damaged by similar events in 2016 and 2017.

The reef system, which covers over 2,300km (1,400 miles), is a World Heritage site recognised for its "enormous scientific and intrinsic importance".

Last year, Australia was forced to downgrade its five-year reef outlook from poor to very poor due to the impact of human-induced climate change.

On Thursday, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority said its latest aerial surveys had shown that the severity of bleaching varied across the reef.

But it said more areas had been damaged than in previous events.

"The reef had only just begun recovering from impacts in 2016 and 2017 and now we have a third event," chief scientist David Wachenfeld told the BBC.

"Climate change is making the extreme events that drive those impacts both more severe and more frequent, so the damage in an event is worse."

The earlier events hit two-thirds of the reef system, wiping out coral populations and destroying habitats for other sea life.

But Dr Wachenfeld said some key reefs for tourism - in the northern and central regions - had been only "moderately bleached" this year. This meant coral there would probably recover, he added.

"The reef is still a vibrant, dynamic system but overall, with every one of these successive events, the reef is more damaged than previously," he said.

"We need to take these events as global calls for the strongest possible action in climate change," he said.

Global temperatures have already risen about 1C since pre-industrial times. The UN has warned that if temperatures rise by 1.5C, 90% of the world's corals will be wiped out.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-52043554

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They want you in electric cars so they can control what zone you are allowed to enter based on your social score

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On 21/04/2020 at 18:14, Happy Blue said:

They want you in electric cars so they can control what zone you are allowed to enter based on your social score

Why can’t they do that with the computers onboard petrol cars?

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2 hours ago, Dr. Gonzo said:

Why can’t they do that with the computers onboard petrol cars?

Because they are not remote controlled like these new all electric cars will be and nobody is going to consent to having there car doctored are they so they can be shut down at will or remote driven ..they need to do it sneaky

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Pretty certain it’s not the powertrain (be it electric/petrol/diesel) that would control the car. It’s the onboard computers. Which are in all modern cars........

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47 minutes ago, Happy Blue said:

Because they are not remote controlled like these new all electric cars will be and nobody is going to consent to having there car doctored are they so they can be shut down at will or remote driven ..they need to do it sneaky

You're quite a paranoid individual aren't you? 

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47 minutes ago, DeadLinesman said:

Pretty certain it’s not the powertrain (be it electric/petrol/diesel) that would control the car. It’s the onboard computers. Which are in all modern cars........

They are not 5G though :what:  ..plus most our current cars cant be remote driven so my point stands

Edited by Happy Blue
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21 minutes ago, Stan said:

You're quite a paranoid individual aren't you? 

My therapist say i'm paranoid  ..he didnt actually say that but i know he was thinking it

 

 

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On 22/04/2020 at 11:14, Happy Blue said:

They want you in electric cars so they can control what zone you are allowed to enter based on your social score

You need to separate out electric cars from self driven cars. They are different things.

Electric cars have no direct emissions, and (provided the local electricity network is cleaner on average than a gasoline engine) are a good technology

Self driven cars are being developed for both gasoline and electric type vehicles. They will theoretically be safer, and provide an ability to completely disrupt personal transportation. Think all cars are owned by uber and different sizes, you just get cars when needed through an app and a driverless pod rocks up at your house.

I have absolutely zero enthusiasm to ever ride in a driverless vehicle and I personally say to the future "fuck off creating things like this that nobody wants".

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2 minutes ago, Harry said:

You need to separate out electric cars from self driven cars. They are different things.

Electric cars have no direct emissions, and (provided the local electricity network is cleaner on average than a gasoline engine) are a good technology

Self driven cars are being developed for both gasoline and electric type vehicles. They will theoretically be safer, and provide an ability to completely disrupt personal transportation. Think all cars are owned by uber and different sizes, you just get cars when needed through an app and a driverless pod rocks up at your house.

I have absolutely zero enthusiasm to ever ride in a driverless vehicle and I personally say to the future "fuck off creating things like this that nobody wants".

They are working on banning petrol and diesel engines so in time the only self driven cars will be electric  ..like you said, they can get fucked with that on less they fly like in blade runner or star wars :)

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Climate change: More than 3bn could live in extreme heat by 2070

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More than three billion people will be living in places with "near un-liveable" temperatures by 2070, according to a new study.

Unless greenhouse gas emissions fall, large numbers of people will experience average temperatures hotter than 29C.

This is considered outside the climate "niche" in which humans have thrived for the past 6,000 years.

Co-author of the study Tim Lenton told the BBC: "The study hopefully puts climate change in more human terms".

Researchers used data from United Nations population projections and a 3C warming scenario based on the expected global rise in temperature. A UN report found that even with countries keeping to the Paris climate agreement, the world was on course for a 3C rise.

According to the study, human populations are concentrated into narrow climate bands with most people residing in places where the average temperature is about 11-15C. A smaller number of people live in areas with an average temperature of 20-25C.

People have mostly lived in these climate conditions for thousands of years.

However, should, global warming cause temperatures to rise by three degrees, a vast number of people are going to be living in temperatures considered outside the "climate niche".

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Mr Lenton, climate specialist and director of the global Systems Institute at the University of Exeter, conducted the study with scientists from China, the US and Europe.

He told the BBC: "The land warms up faster than the ocean so the land is warming more than three degrees. Population growth is projected to be in already hot places, mostly sub-Saharan Africa so that shifts the average person to a hotter temperature.

"It's shifting the whole distribution of people to hotter places which themselves are getting hotter and that's why we find the average person on the planet is living in about 7C warmer conditions in the 3C warmer world."

Areas projected to be affected include northern Australia, India, Africa, South America and parts of the Middle East.

The study raises concerns about those in poorer areas who will be unable to shelter from the heat.

"For me, the study is not about the rich who can just get inside an air-conditioned building and insulate themselves from anything. We have to be concerned with those who don't have the means to isolate themselves from the weather and the climate around them," Mr Lenton said.

Mr Lenton says the main message from the team's findings is that "limiting climate change could have huge benefits in terms of reducing the number of people projected to fall outside of the climate niche.

"It's about roughly a billion people for each degree of warming beyond the present. So for every degree of warming, we could be saving a huge amount of change in people's livelihoods."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-52543589

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Coral bleaching: Scientists 'find a way to make coral more heat-resistant'

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Scientists in Australia say they have found a way to help coral reefs fight the devastating effects of bleaching by making them more heat-resistant.

Rising sea temperatures make corals expel tiny algae which live inside them. This turns the corals white and effectively starves them.

In response, researchers have developed a lab-grown strain of microalgae which is more tolerant of heat.

When injected back into the coral, the algae can handle warmer water better.

What is coral bleaching and how bad is it?

The researchers believe their findings may help in the effort to restore coral reefs, which they say are "suffering mass mortalities from marine heatwaves".

The team made the coral - which is a type of animal, a marine invertebrate - more tolerant to temperature-induced bleaching by bolstering the heat tolerance of its microalgal symbionts - tiny cells of algae that live inside the coral tissue.

They then exposed the cultured microalgae to increasingly warmer temperatures over a period of four years. This assisted them to adapt and survive hotter conditions.

"Once the microalgae were reintroduced into coral larvae, the newly established coral-algal symbiosis was more heat-tolerant compared to the original one," lead author Dr Patrick Buerger, of Csiro, Australia's national science agency, said in a statement.

"We found that the heat-tolerant microalgae are better at photosynthesis and improve the heat response of the coral animal," Prof Madeleine van Oppen, of the Australian Institute of Marine Science and the University of Melbourne, said.

"These exciting findings show that the microalgae and the coral are in direct communication with each other."

The next step is to further test the algal strains across a range of coral species.

How bad is coral bleaching?

"Coral reefs are in decline worldwide," Dr Buerger says.

"Climate change has reduced coral cover, and surviving corals are under increasing pressure as water temperatures rise and the frequency and severity of coral bleaching events increase."

Earlier this year, Australia's Great Barrier Reef suffered a mass bleaching event - the third in just five years.

Warmer sea temperatures - particularly in February - are feared to have caused huge coral loss across it.

Scientists say they have detected widespread bleaching, including extensive patches of severe damage. But they have also found healthy pockets.

Two-thirds of the reef - the world's largest such system - were damaged by similar events in 2016 and 2017.

You may also be interested in:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-52661860

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Climate change: Scientists fear car surge will see CO2 rebound

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Daily global emissions of CO2 fell by 17% at the peak of the shutdown because of measures taken by governments in response to Covid-19, say, scientists.

The most comprehensive account yet published says that almost half the record decrease was due to fewer car journeys.

But the authors are worried that, as people return to work, car use will soar again.

They fear CO2 emissions could soon be higher than before the crisis.

They are urging politicians to grasp the moment and make real, durable changes on transport and personal mobility.

FULL REPORT

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Amazon under threat: fires, loggers and now virus

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The Amazon rainforest - which plays a vital role in balancing the world's climate and helping fight global warming - is also suffering as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Deforestation jumped 55% in the first four months of 2020 compared with the same period last year, as people have taken advantage of the crisis to carry out illegal clearances.

Deforestation, illegal mining, land clearances and wildfires were already at an 11-year high and scientists say we're fast approaching a point of no return - after which the Amazon will no longer function as it should.

Here, we look at the pressures pushing the Amazon to the brink and ask what the nine countries that share this unique natural resource are doing to protect it.

FULL REPORT

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Climate change: 'Stunning' seafloor ridges record Antarctic retreat

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Scientists are learning just how fast the ice margin of Antarctica can retreat in a warming world.

They've identified features on the seafloor that indicate the ice edge was reversing at rates of up to 50m a day at the end of the last ice age.

That's roughly 10 times faster than what's observed by satellites today.

The discovery is important because it puts realistic constraints on the computer simulations that are used to project future change in the region.

"In numerical models, you play with the parameters - and they can do very strange things," said Prof Julian Dowdeswell. "But what these data are saying is that actually rates considerably higher than we get even in the satellite record today were possible in the not-far-distant geological past."

The director of the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI) in Cambridge, UK, led an expedition last year to the Larsen region of the Antarctic Peninsula.

His team deployed autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) with high-resolution mapping capability to examine the sediments at the bottom of the western Weddell Sea.

What the robots saw was a delicate pattern of ridges that looked like a series of ladders where each rung was about 1.5m high and spaced roughly 20-25m apart.

The scientists interpret these ridges to be features that are generated at the ice grounding zone.

The zone is the point where the ice flowing off Antarctica into the ocean becomes buoyant and starts to float. The rungs are created as the ice at this location repeatedly pats the sediments as the tides rise and fall.

FULL REPORT

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One-fifth of Earth's ocean floor is now mapped

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We've just become a little less ignorant about Planet Earth.

The initiative that seeks to galvanise the creation of a full map of the ocean floor says one-fifth of this task has now been completed.

When the Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project was launched in 2017, only 6% of the global ocean bottom had been surveyed to what might be called modern standards.

That number now stands at 19%, up from 15% in just the last year.

Some 14.5 million sq km of new bathymetric (depth) data was included in the GEBCO grid in 2019 - an area equivalent to almost twice that of Australia.

It does, however, still leave a great swathe of the planet unmapped to an acceptable degree.

"Today we stand at the 19% level. That means we've got another 81% of the oceans still to survey, still to map. That's an area about twice the size of Mars that we have to capture in the next decade," project director Jamie McMichael-Phillips told BBC News.

FULL REPORT

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Climate change: Arctic heatwave temperatures reach possible all-time high

Average temperatures in Siberia were 10°C above average last month.

The UN weather agency warned that average temperatures in Siberia were 10°C above average last month, a spate of exceptional heat that has fanned devastating fires in the Arctic Circle and contributed to a rapid depletion in ice sea off Russia’s Arctic coast.

“The Arctic is heating more than twice as fast as the global average, impacting local populations and ecosystems and with global repercussions,” World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) secretary-general Petteri Taalas said in a statement.

He noted that Earth’s poles influence weather conditions far away, where hundreds of millions of people live.

The WMO previously cited a reading of 38°C in the Russian town of Verkhoyansk on 20 June, which the agency has been seeking to verify as a possible record-high temperature in the Arctic Circle.

It comes as fires have swept through the region, with satellite imagery showing the breadth of the area surface.

The agency says the extended heat is linked to a large “blocking pressure system” and northward swing of the jet stream that has injected warm air into the region.
 
But the WMO also pointed to a recent study by top climate scientists who found that such a rise in heat would have been nearly impossible without human-caused climate change.
The WMO said information collected by the US National Snow and Ice Data Centre and the US National Ice Centre showed the Siberian heatwave had “accelerated the ice retreat along the Arctic Russian coast, in particular since late June, leading to very low sea ice extent in the Laptev and Barents Seas.”

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European Sentinel satellites to map global CO2 emissions

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German manufacturer OHB-System has signed a €445m (£400m) contract to begin construction of a satellite network to monitor carbon dioxide.

The CO2M constellation will consist in the first instance of two spacecraft, but there is an option for a third.

The platforms will track the greenhouse gas across the globe, helping nations assess the scale of their emissions.

Under the Paris climate accord, countries must compile CO2 inventories. CO2M will provide supporting data.

The aim is to launch the OHB spacecraft in 2025 so they can inform the international stocktake that will report in 2028.

FULL REPORT

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No way will they vanish...well, I hope not, cod & chips are one of my favourites. :(

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National favourite, cod and chips, at climate change risk

Consumers may have to change their eating habits due to declining fish stocks, according to scientists.

Popular dishes such as cod and chips could be under threat and disappear from British menus due to climate change, a study has warned.

Researchers analysed its effects on stocks for south-west England’s fisheries and said families may have to change their diets to save the threatened species.

The Celtic Sea, English Channel and the southern North Sea have experienced significant warming over the past 40 years, and further increases in sea temperatures are expected.

Computer projections up to the year 2090 suggest increases in abundance of warm-adapted species such as red mullet, Dover sole, John Dory and lemon sole, and decreases in cold species such as cod, monkfish and megrim.

The study, published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, involved the Universities of Exeter and Bristol, the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), and the Met Office.

They said declining species may need help and there will be implications for the wider ecosystem.

https://www.sciencefocus.com/news/national-favourite-cod-and-chips-at-climate-change-risk/

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Plug-in hybrids are a 'wolf in sheep's clothing'

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Carbon dioxide emissions from plug-in hybrid cars are as much as two-and-a-half times higher than official tests suggest, according to new research.

Plug-in hybrid vehicles are powered by an electric motor using a battery that is recharged by being plugged in or via an on-board petrol or diesel engine.

They account for 3% of new car sales.

But analysis from pressure groups Transport and Environment and Greenpeace suggest they emit an average of 120g of CO2 per km.

That compares with the 44g per km in official "lab" tests

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are sold as a low-carbon alternative to traditional vehicles and conventional hybrids - which cannot be recharged from an external source - and are proving increasingly popular.

The new research is published as the government considers whether to bring forward a proposed ban on the sale of new petrol, diesel and conventional hybrid cars from 2035 to 2030.

'Official' versus 'real world'

The BBC understands one suggestion is that plug-in hybrids should be given a stay of execution, with new sales allowed to continue until 2035.

That's because they can offer a 20- to the 40-mile range as a purely electric vehicle and are therefore potentially significantly less polluting than other vehicles.

But this new analysis from Transport and Environment and Greenpeace suggests they don't offer anything like the carbon dioxide savings claimed for them by manufacturers.

The official tests indicate that plug-in hybrids emit an average of 44g per km of CO2. These tests are conducted on a circuit and see vehicles driven in a way that regulators consider "normal".

The real figure, however, according to the report, is more like 120g per km.

The pressure groups have analysed what they say is "real-world" data on fuel efficiency collected from some 20,000 plug-in hybrid drivers around Europe.

These are drivers who have chosen to record their mileage and fuel consumption for surveys or who drive company or leased vehicles whose fuel efficiency is recorded.

According to this data-set the lifetime emissions of a plug-in hybrid average around 28 tonnes of CO2.

By comparison, the average petrol or diesel car is estimated to emit between 39 and 41 tonnes of CO2 from fuel during its lifetime, a conventional hybrid would typically emit more like 33 tonnes.

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According to these figures, a plug-in hybrid would only deliver an emissions reduction of about a third on a typical petrol or diesel car - far less than the official estimates.

The motor industry acknowledges that lab tests don't always reflect real-world use but criticised the report, saying it uses emissions data from a test that is two years old.

"PHEVs provide a flexibility few other technologies can yet match with extended range for longer, out-of-town journeys and battery power in urban areas, reducing emissions and improving city air quality," Mike Hawes, the chief executive of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders told the BBC.

He says he expects the range and performance will continue to improve, making them an "essential stepping stone to a fully electric vehicle".

Greenpeace meanwhile describes PHEVs as "the car industry's wolf in sheep's clothing".

"They may seem a much more environmentally friendly choice," says Rebecca Newsom, the pressure group's head of politics, "but false claims of lower emissions are a ploy by car manufacturers to go on producing SUVs and petrol and diesel engines."

Driver behaviour

Transport and Environment's analysis says a key problem with plug-in hybrids is that so many owners rarely actually charge their cars, meaning they rely on the petrol or diesel engine.

Another is that many plug-in hybrid models include design features that automatically turn on the petrol/diesel engine at start-up on a cold day, or will kick in that engine if the driver accelerates hard.

The latter mode means that the car's emissions will depend a lot on the driver's behaviour.

"If you always charge the battery and tend to do lots of short journeys, they will have very low emissions," says Nick Molden, who runs Emissions Analytics, a company that specialises in vehicle emissions evaluation.

"If you never charge the battery and drive very aggressively then they can have significantly higher emissions than the equivalent petrol or diesel model," he continues.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-54170207

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Satellite achieves sharp-eyed view of methane

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There is a powerful new satellite in the sky to monitor emissions of methane (CH4), one of the key gases driving human-induced climate change.

Known as Iris, the spacecraft can map plumes of CH4 in the atmosphere down to a resolution of just 25m.

This makes it possible to identify individual sources, such as specific oil and gas facilities.

Iris was launched by the Montreal, Canada-based GHGSat company on 2 September.

It's the pathfinder in what the firm hopes will be a 10-spacecraft constellation by the end of 2022.

The image at the top of this page is Iris's "first light" - its first attempt to sense a significant emission of methane.

The observation was made over Turkmenistan, in a region where large plumes from oil and gas infrastructure have been noted before.

The detection, overlaid on a standard aerial image, shows the concentration of methane in the air in excess of normal background levels.

"Let me tell you there was a big hurrah from the team when the data came down because we could see the spectroscopy was there, the resolution was there - everything was as it should be," recalled GHGSat CEO Stéphane Germain.

"We still need to work on the calibration, which will then allow us to verify the detection threshold and the final performance of the satellite. But as a first-light image - by any standard it's phenomenal," he told BBC News.

Methane's global warming potential is 30 times that of carbon dioxide, so it's imperative any unnecessary releases are constrained or curtailed.

Human-produced sources are many and varied, including not only oil and gas facilities but agriculture, landfills, coal mines and hydro-electric dams.

Already, GHGSat is working with operators, regulators and other interested parties to characterise these emissions using a prototype satellite called Claire that it launched in 2016. The presence in orbit of Iris provides an additional stream of data for the company that it now intends to interpret at a brand new British analytics hub, to be set up in Edinburgh and London in the coming weeks.

"There's a world-class capability in what we do in the UK," Dr Germain said, "not only in analytics but also in the spacecraft systems that we're interested in.

"The UK is a jurisdiction where climate change is important to people, and we want to be where people are willing to participate in the growth of an enterprise that wants to address that worldwide."

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GHGSat has recently been strengthening its ties with the European Space Agency, which operates the EU's Sentinel-5P satellite.

This also monitors methane, taking a global daily snapshot of the gas. But at a resolution of 7km, its data is much less resolved than that of Iris, or indeed Claire which senses the atmosphere at scales of 50m.

Put them all together, however, and they form something of a dream team for investigating CH4.

"They (Sentinel-5P) can see the whole world every day. We can't do that. But we can see individual facilities. They can't do that. So, really, it's a fantastic combination, and it's making for a very good relationship with the European Space Agency that I think we're just at the beginning of growing into something much, much bigger."

GHG's next satellite, Hugo, is in testing and is expected to launch at the end of this year.

The company recently secured $30m (£23m) in extra financing, which enables it to build the three spacecraft that will follow Hugo into orbit.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-54210367

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