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There's a Wolf on the loose in Reading...


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Wolves are hardly ever dangerous.  It’s a myth that they just go for people in an attempt to try and eat them. In Galicia where my parents are from there are lots of them and my father took me to see a wild pack with puppies once which is when they’re at their most dangerous... I was able to approach without any problems. They’re afraid of humans and if you ignore them they’ll ignore you too.

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3 hours ago, SirBalon said:

Wolves are hardly ever dangerous.  It’s a myth that they just go for people in an attempt to try and eat them. In Galicia where my parents are from there are lots of them and my father took me to see a wild pack with puppies once which is when they’re at their most dangerous... I was able to approach without any problems. They’re afraid of humans and if you ignore them they’ll ignore you too.

It would probably roll around on its back and let you tickle its belly :ph34r:.

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3 hours ago, SirBalon said:

Wolves are hardly ever dangerous.  It’s a myth that they just go for people in an attempt to try and eat them. In Galicia where my parents are from there are lots of them and my father took me to see a wild pack with puppies once which is when they’re at their most dangerous... I was able to approach without any problems. They’re afraid of humans and if you ignore them they’ll ignore you too.

to be fair if I saw a middle-aged man wearing just white pants coming towards me, I'd be afraid as well.

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3 hours ago, SirBalon said:

Wolves are hardly ever dangerous.  It’s a myth that they just go for people in an attempt to try and eat them. In Galicia where my parents are from there are lots of them and my father took me to see a wild pack with puppies once which is when they’re at their most dangerous... I was able to approach without any problems. They’re afraid of humans and if you ignore them they’ll ignore you too.

This. I spent many summers in the countryside with a lot of forest and wildlife and had a few run-ins with wolfs too; it was common knowledge that a wolf won't attack you unless it's rabid (most likely), it's defending its territory (less likely), or it's extremely hungry and desperate (very unlikely). Small children are definitely more vulnerable in those cases if they somehow approach a wolf alone.

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15 hours ago, nudge said:

This. I spent many summers in the countryside with a lot of forest and wildlife and had a few run-ins with wolfs too; it was common knowledge that a wolf won't attack you unless it's rabid (most likely), it's defending its territory (less likely), or it's extremely hungry and desperate (very unlikely). Small children are definitely more vulnerable in those cases if they somehow approach a wolf alone.

Where my parents originate from up in maountanous areas that are very forested, wolves live in those areas and my father would tell that as a teenager when he’d return late from a friend’s house in winter because people’s houses are separated by large plots of land and you’d have traipse through the forests at times that you’d carry a cattle stick which was literally just a long walking type stick with the small point of a nail poking out of one end...

The reason for this is that if there’s ever a dodgy period with wolves it’s in winter when it gets dark early and most small animals wolves hunt are either hibernating or just more difficult to hunt down because there’s not much for them to feed on.  I say this, but even then he would say to me that wolves weren’t really a danger to humans in that period, but that if you were walking alone at night they would follow you silently behind you.  That you would hear the rustle of the leaves from time to time and even the howling of the pack they’d left behind calling out to them to orientate them.  

The reason they’d be following you is because the probability is that where you live you’d have sheep, chickens or other animals and not so much because of you.  So the reason behind the stick wasn’t as a defence weapon of sorts, but because of that pointed nail at the end.  If you sensed the wolves on your tail, you would bang the stick nail end down on a rock and it would cause a spark which the wolves are very afraid off... At this point my father said you’d hear them scurry away and the following had ceased.  A way of protecting you from inadvertently taking a hunter to your livestock.

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