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Your top 5 favourite books of all time

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Or top 3. Or top 10. Or top 15. Or whatever you feel like. Doesn't have to be in any particular order either; I know at least for me it's impossible to rank my most favourite ones. Anyway - would love to hear what everyone's favourite books are and why. Maybe a separate list for fiction and non-fiction books if you feel like it. 

I'll do my list tomorrow as I'm heading to bed soon but just wanted to post this now before I forget it :ph34r:

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Posted (edited)

I'm only going to explain my Non-Fiction choices since it's more important to know in advance what they're about, and trying to describe why you like novels normally just turns into faux-artsy wankery.

Top 3 Novels:

Die Verwandlung, Kafka

The Grapes of Wrath, Steinbeck

As I Lay Dying, Faulkner

 

Top 3 Non-Fiction:

The Great Transformation, Polanyi

-best economic history I've ever read, covering basically every facet of the progression from pre-modern economic life to the market society as we now know it.

The Sleepwalkers, Clark

-a basically untouchable account of arguably the most complex event in history, the outbreak of WW1. 

The Making of the Indebted Man, Lazzarato

-a quite pessimistic but very thought-provoking look at how debt and credit has become the major ordering force in society and its psychological impact on modern life. 

 

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Fiction.

The Fall - Albert Camus

Ragged Trousered Philanthropists - Robert Tressell

Germinal - Emile Zola

Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens

Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte

Non-Fiction....too many to mention, I love history books

Rise and Fall of the Third Reich - William Shirer

A People's Tragedy: The Russian Revolution - Orlando Figes

The Ball is Round - David Goblatt.

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I used to read alot more in my late teens and early twenties Ill just list what I remember really shining to in no particular order, mostly fiction.

All Quiet on the Western Front

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series (original 3)

Troy series by David Gemmel (3 books)

The Hobbit

Watership Down

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

 

 

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No particular order:

Catch-22 - Joseph Heller

The Crying of Lot 49 - Thomas Pynchon

A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole

The Count of Monte Cristo - Alexander Dumas

Redbrest - Jo Nesbo

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All the Lee Childs - Jack Recher books 1 to 23, his next book Blue Moon gets released in October this year so then it will be 24, I can't really say in order which is the best as they are all good. :coffee:

 

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A Clockwork Orange

Hadji Murad by Tolstoy

The Incredible Journey by Shiela Burnford

Inferno by Dan Brown

Brave new World by Aldous Huxley

 

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5 hours ago, CaaC - John said:

                                                                                               his next book Blue Moon gets released in October this year

Our son is visiting so that's my Christmas prezzie sorted out from him... 9_9 :D

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Posted (edited)

Fiction:

The little world of Don Camillo by Giovanino Guareschi

The water-method man by John Irving

Panter, Tiger & Co by Kurt Tucholsky

Non- fiction

Vertigo years by Philipp Blom, a historical and sociological treatise how the lives of the citizens of industrialised countries at the beginning of the last century was completely altered through economic innovation and scientific progress

Rosa Luxemburg by Paul Frölich, a biography of the revolutionary marxist labour leader and feminist written by a reformist social democrat.

Haltet die Saar, Genossen! by Ralph Schock ( probably only available in German), an anthology of political texts of Saarish as well as emigrated authors from other parts of Germany, who tried to convince the Saarish people not to vote for reunification with Germany at the 1935 plebiscite.   These texts include a span from anarchists and communists over social-democrats and middle class centrists to Jehova's witnesses and  Quakers.

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7 minutes ago, Rucksackfranzose said:

Vertigo years by Philipp Blom, a historical and sociological treatise how the lives of the citizens of industrialised countries at the beginning of the last century was completely altered through economic innovation and scientific progress

Just googled it for more information and reviews; sounds very interesting. Ordered it already :twothumbsup:

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Posted (edited)

In no particular order some of my favourites:

Catch 22 Words can't describe how much I love this book. And probably the only book I have read multiple times, and still never got bored. 

Vyakti Ani Vali, a Marathi language book by the genius Pu. La. Deshpande. 

The Fortunate Pilgrim , my favourite Mario Puzo book. Beautifully written and well defined characters. 

A Suitable Boy Vikram Seth's magnum opus of sorts. Every subject, attached to his characters and/or story he covers in this book is described in correct detail. Despite being a big book at 1000+ pages, I found it engaging from start to the end. 

The Great Gatsby A lot of people either dislike this one, or deem it overrated. I don't care. To me, there was smoothness in the sentences and the narration. If I have to compare this to food, then it felt like a soft, airy, light but tasty Vanilla sponge cake. 

The White Tiger Aravind Adiga introduced me, a relatively privileged city kid, to the harsh realities of life in unknown corners of my country. Later on I went on to read Rahul Pandita's Hello Bastar, a nonfiction on the same subject and it made me angrier. 

God of Small Things I despise Arundhati Roy's politics to the point of disliking even her for her habitual lying, support of terrorists and hatred towards the country, but I cannot deny her writing skills in this wonderful novel. 

Our Moon has Blood Clots Rahul Pandita, a Kashmiri Pandit himself, charts the genocide and exodus of Kashmiri pandits from the Kashmir valley, and also offers the truth about that region. An essential reading if you really want to understand Kashmir. 

Annihilation of Caste Almost all works of Dr. Ambedkar are worth reading, but this one in particular is the most essential of them all. To me he is the greatest Indian, even far ahead of Gandhi. 

I have probably forgotten some, which I might add if I remember. I also think Philip Dick's Do Android Dream of Electric Sheep will feature in my favourites once I read it, considering I am obsessed with Blade runner. 

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43 minutes ago, IgnisExcubitor said:

In no particular order some of my favourites:

Catch 22 Words can't describe how much I love this book. And probably the only book I have read multiple times, and still never got bored. 

Vyakti Ani Vali, a Marathi language book by the genius Pu. La. Deshpande. 

The Fortunate Pilgrim , my favourite Mario Puzo book. Beautifully written and well defined characters. 

A Suitable Boy Vikram Seth's magnum opus of sorts. Every subject, attached to his characters and/or story he covers in this book is described in correct detail. Despite being a big book at 1000+ pages, I found it engaging from start to the end. 

The Great Gatsby A lot of people either dislike this one, or deem it overrated. I don't care. To me, there was smoothness in the sentences and the narration. If I have to compare this to food, then it felt like a soft, airy, light but tasty Vanilla sponge cake. 

The White Tiger Aravind Adiga introduced me, a relatively privileged city kid, to the harsh realities of life in unknown corners of my country. Later on I went on to read Rahul Pandita's Hello Bastar, a nonfiction on the same subject and it made me angrier. 

God of Small Things I despise Arundhati Roy's politics to the point of disliking even her for her habitual lying, support of terrorists and hatred towards the country, but I cannot deny her writing skills in this wonderful novel. 

Our Moon has Blood Clots Rahul Pandita, a Kashmiri Pandit himself, charts the genocide and exodus of Kashmiri pandits from the Kashmir valley, and also offers the truth about that region. An essential reading if you really want to understand Kashmir. 

Annihilation of Caste Almost all works of Dr. Ambedkar are worth reading, but this one in particular is the most essential of them all. To me he is the greatest Indian, even far ahead of Gandhi. 

I have probably forgotten some, which I might add if I remember. I also think Philip Dick's Do Android Dream of Electric Sheep will feature in my favourites once I read it, considering I am obsessed with Blade runner. 

The White Tiger is such a fucking great book

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Don Quixote 

Songs of Solomon by Toni Morrison. Didnt think I was going to enjoy it but we read this book during Honors English and our teacher did a great job explaining all the symbolism within the book. 

For Whom The Bells Toll-- Hemingway 

The Innocent Man: Murder and Injustice in a Small Town : John Grisham 

One Hundred Years of Solitude -Gabriel Garcia Marquez 

--

I dont see how people enjoy As I lay Dying or any book by Faulkner, the only worst book i can think of is Great expectations. 

 

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1 hour ago, IgnisExcubitor said:

The White Tiger Aravind Adiga introduced me, a relatively privileged city kid, to the harsh realities of life in unknown corners of my country. Later on I went on to read Rahul Pandita's Hello Bastar, a nonfiction on the same subject and it made me angrier. 

 

 

45 minutes ago, Dr. Gonzo said:

The White Tiger is such a fucking great book

I love this book; should probably have put it into my list... Good shout.

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