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Anyone heard anything about it? A very interesting read. https://www.businessinsider.com/submarine-to-visit-deepest-parts-of-the-ocean-in-five-deeps-expedition-2018-10

A short summary: 

The world’s first manned expedition to the deepest point in each of the five oceans, and the ultimate validation of a unique deep-sea, manned research submersible. The Five Deeps Expedition is the first to attempt to reach the deepest point in each of the Earth’s five oceans: the Puerto Rico Trench in the Atlantic, South Sandwich Trench in the Southern Ocean, Java Trench in the Indian Ocean, Challenger Deep in the Pacific and Molloy Deep in the Arctic.

  • The expedition will traverse 40,000 nautical miles / 74,000 km in 11 months.
  • By the end of the expedition the sub will have descended through at least 72,000 m / 236,220 ft of water.
  • Up to 50 scientific lander deployments will be undertaken alongside the submersible dives.
  • No human has ever been to the bottom of the Java, Puerto Rico* or South Sandwich trenches.
  • No one has ever been to the bottom of Molloy Deep.
  • No manned submersible has ever been to Challenger Deep more than once.
  • No person has ever been to the summit of Mount Everest and also been to the bottom of the ocean at Challenger Deep, which could occur on this expedition.

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The 48 million $ submersible vehicle called Triton is made mainly of Titanium and is able to change shape according to pressure. 

The world’s first two-person, titanium-hulled submersible fully tested to 120% of full ocean depth (FOD) and commercially certified for thousands of dives. It is accompanied by a 68 meter dedicated research & exploration ship, a trio of advanced FOD-capable seafloor landers as well as an FOD-capable echo sounder and multi-beam sonar capable of mapping the sea floor – a technical Tour de Force.

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The Five Deeps Expedition’s scientific program is led by renowned chief scientist Dr. Alan Jamieson, University of Newcastle, and will bring forth findings from never-before-explored depths to the global academic, oceanographic and environmental communities. The expedition provides the unprecedented opportunity to sample life across a gradient of depths, temperatures, salinity, food supply, latitude and in places around the world that were formed, split, or united millions of years ago by the shifting of the Earth’s tectonic plates.

GOALS

  • Find deep-sea features and habitats using high-resolution multibeam sonar
  • Learn what lives in those habitats using direct visitation by landers (Flere, Skaff and Closp) and submersible (Limiting Factor)
  • Discover how organisms survive in Hadal zones using the Pressure Drop’s onboard wet lab
  • Determine organisms’ role in each given ecosystem
  • Connect the Five Deeps through genetic differentiation of species found on the dives
  • Determine which “rules” the organisms follow including features, behaviors or characteristics of a species that are shared globally

Official website of the expedition: https://fivedeeps.com

 

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This looks so exciting!

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1 minute ago, Azeem said:

So its The Core but in reality

More like the Meg :P 

 

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Just now, nudge said:

More like the Meg :P 

 

Why does it say no one has ever been to the summit of Mount Everest ?

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Just now, Azeem said:

Why does it say no one has ever been to the summit of Mount Everest ?

it says that no one has ever been BOTH to the summit of Mount Everest AND ALSO to the bottom of the ocean at Challenger Deep... 

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1 minute ago, nudge said:

it says that no one has ever been BOTH to the summit of Mount Everest AND ALSO to the bottom of the ocean at Challenger Deep... 

THANK YOU ! 

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Very interesting, haven't heard anything about it. If they find something interesting they will hide it though, unless they're filming the whole thing 24/7 like big brother.

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14 minutes ago, Berserker said:

Very interesting, haven't heard anything about it. If they find something interesting they will hide it though, unless they're filming the whole thing 24/7 like big brother.

I think we are not going to get anything mind-blowing-and-life-changing anyway as it's primarily a biological, geological and oceanographic study (unless they find Cthulhu down there xD), but I'm stoked to see new kinds of alien monster looking deep sea creatures that we haven't discovered yet! Nature is amazing; it's hard to imagine that anyone could survive let alone thrive in such harsh conditions of high pressure, pitch darkness, extreme cold, little oxygen...and yet nevertheless we have all those various life forms adapted to the conditions at the bottom of the ocean! 

As for filming, I'm sure they won't stream it 24/7, but the expedition will be documented by the Discovery and Science Channel on the series called Deep Planet which is slated to air in 2019.

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2 hours ago, nudge said:

unless they find Cthulhu down there

Someday when mankind has abandoned it's morals and descended into madness they will wake Cthulhu from his slumber and he will raise the old ones from death and all the world will flame in the holocaust of ecstasy and freedom... Nothing belongs to man, not this world, not the home they have built on it, not even the human mind, It is the ultimate destiny of this species to unravel into primal chaos as all things must.

To the sounds of their laughter and exultant shouts all man has ever built will one day fade away... 

 

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12 minutes ago, Bluewolf said:

Someday when mankind has abandoned it's morals and descended into madness they will wake Cthulhu from his slumber and he will raise the old ones from death and all the world will flame in the holocaust of ecstasy and freedom... Nothing belongs to man, not this world, not the home they have built on it, not even the human mind, It is the ultimate destiny of this species to unravel into primal chaos as all things must.

To the sounds of their laughter and exultant shouts all man has ever built will one day fade away... 

 

Who knows the end? What has risen may sink, and what has sunk may rise. Loathsomeness waits and dreams in the deep, and decay spreads over the tottering cities of men.

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One down, four more to go... The Triton has just dived to 8,376 meters in the Puerto Rico Trench, the deepest part of the Atlantic Ocean, making it the deepest diving manned submersible in the world today! 

48409248_2150032865053044_72663808055915

 

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4 hours ago, nudge said:

One down, four more to go... The Triton has just dived to 8,376 meters in the Puerto Rico Trench, the deepest part of the Atlantic Ocean, making it the deepest diving manned submersible in the world today! 

48409248_2150032865053044_72663808055915

 

Any monsters yet? 

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7 minutes ago, Cicero said:

Any monsters yet? 

Nah but this one is kind of cute...

deep-sea-creatures-new-species-okeanos-e

 

And this one is weird....

deep-sea-creatures-new-species-okeanos-e

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Mission update:

1st dive: Atantic - Puerto Rico Trench - COMPLETE. In a historic feat, explorer Victor Vescovo became the first human to dive on a solo mission to the deepest point in the Atlantic Ocean – the verified bottom of the Puerto Rico Trench at 8,376 meters/27,480 feet in his private submersible, the Limiting Factor. The trench was previously explored to approximately 8,300 meters by the French submersible Archimede in 1964, but it did not reach the deepest point. The dive also makes the Limiting Factorthe deepest diving operational submersible in the world, surpassing the previous operational record-holder, the Chinese submersible Jiaolong which has reportedly reached a maximum depth of 7,062 meters. A groundbreaking documentary series about the expedition is also being filmed by Atlantic Productions for Discovery Channel, and will air in 2019/2020.

In addition to Vescovo’s solo dive, the expedition also accomplished:

  • First manned descent to the verified bottom of the Puerto Rico Trench, the deepest part of the Atlantic Ocean
  • First American-made submersible to dive deeper than 6,100 meters since the US Navy’s DSV-4 Sea Cliffin 1985, thirty-three years ago
  • Only the second solo dive made deeper than 5,000 meters. Only James Cameron in his Deepsea Challengerhas made a deeper solo dive, to full ocean depth (10,908 meters) in 2012

2nd dive: Southern - South Sandwich Trench - COMPLETE.  The Five Deeps Expedition crosses another historic dive off its list when explorer Victor Vescovo became the first human to dive to the deepest point in the Southern Ocean – in the southern portion of the South Sandwich Trench – at 7,433.6 meters/24,388 feet in his private submersible, the Limiting Factor. Located just north of the Antarctic continent, the Southern Ocean’s South Sandwich Trench has not been thoroughly explored and is the only subzero Hadal zone (deeper than 6,000 meters) in the world. No human has ever dived in the trench, and what few samples have been taken from its hadal depths, date back to the early 1970s. Due to its remote location, this dive posed many logistical and weather-related challenges, however the scientific findings could prove to be groundbreaking.

In addition to Vescovo’s solo dive, the expedition also accomplished:

  • First human being to reach the bottom of the Southern Ocean in the southern portion of the South Sandwich Trench
  • Most accurate mapping of the South Sandwich Trench to date using a modern multibeam sonar system • Deepest dive into a sub-zero Hadal zone, only the third solo dive below 7,000 meters
  • The third-deepest solo dive in history, after James Cameron’s 2012 dive to the Pacific Ocean’s Challenger Deep, and Vescovo’s dive in December 2019 to the bottom of the Atlantic

3rd dive: Indian - Java Trench - COMPLETE. For the third time, the Five Deeps Expedition has successfully dived to the previously-unvisited bottom of one of the world’s five oceans. The team completed a mission to reach one of the most isolated points on the planet: the deepest point of the Java Trench in the Indian Ocean. Now measured at 7,192 meters/23,596 feet deep, Victor Vescovo is the first human to dive to its depths in the DSV Limiting Factor (Triton 36000/2 model submersible) the world’s deepest diving, currently operational submarine. At the bottom of the trench, the team managed to capture footage from the sub and from the landers of what are believed to be entirely new species, yet unseen by humans. From the sub, a new species of hadal snailfish was observed amongst many other bottom dwelling organisms, and the landers observed an extraordinary gelatinous animal – thought to be a stalked Ascidean, otherwise known as a Sea Squirt – which does not resemble anything seen before.

In addition to Vescovo’s solo dive, the expedition also accomplished:  

  • First descent to the bottom of the Indian Ocean
  • The most solo dives - three - deeper than 7,000m have now been made by a single individual, Victor Vescovo
  • First manned descent of any significant depth (below 2,000 meters) in the Java Trench and the first descent to the absolute bottom of the trench (7,192m)
  • Deepest dive by a British citizen (Scottish) in that country’s history, by Dr. Alan Jamieson to 7,180 meters, and first to visit a hadal zone
  • First seabed lander operations including biological sampling and depth confirmation at the bottom of the Diamantina Fracture Zone in the Indian Ocean, 800 miles west of the Australian coast
  • Discovered at least 4 new species of life, including one significantly-sized, stalked Ascidean, previously unseen by any member of the expedition science team
  • Completed the third dive of the Five Deeps Expedition and thus 60% complete with the overall mission, and remaining on schedule for completion in September 2019

 

Three down, two more to go! Next step - Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench!

 

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35 minutes ago, nudge said:

Three down, two more to go! Next step - Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench!

                                                                                                           9_9

Looking forward to this one :x

 

290px-Marianatrenchmap.png

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My dream as a child was to be the first person to start a new civilisation under the sea.... 😔

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2 minutes ago, Harry said:

My dream as a child was to be the first person to start a new civilisation under the sea.... 😔

Or in other words you wanted to shag ariel 

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Hahaha no definitely not I never even saw that movie. I was imagining underwater buildings on stilts with an airlock where you could swim up through the floor.

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@nudge, you will love this, a long read though :D

 

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Mariana Trench: Deepest-ever sub dive finds a plastic bag

By Rebecca MorelleScience Correspondent, BBC News

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An American explorer has found plastic waste on the seafloor while breaking the record for the deepest ever dive.

Victor Vescovo descended nearly 11km (seven miles) to the deepest place in the ocean - the Pacific Ocean's Mariana Trench.

He spent four hours exploring the bottom of the trench in his submersible, built to withstand the immense pressure of the deep.

He found sea creatures, but also found a plastic bag and sweet wrappers.

It is the third time humans have reached the ocean's extreme depths.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-48230157

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Mysterious shark ‘older than the dinosaurs’ caught on film

Rob Waugh

AAE27u3.img?h=611&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

The shark was captured on film (Ocean X)

A shark which has been on our planet for nearly 200 million years, and which has eluded researchers has finally been caught on film - and tagged.

It’s the first time the bluntnose sixgill has been satellite-tagged in this way, the researchers say, with the mysterious creatures usually staying 8,200 feet down.

The team from Ocean X and Florida University tagged the creature from a submersible vehicle.

It’s the first time this has ever been achieved, as the creatures have previously been ‘surface-tagged’ (ie taken to the surface), which researchers have worried could affect the data.

Gallery: Amazing facts about sharks (Best Life)

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The researchers wrote, ‘Because bluntnose sixgills are a deep-sea species, it’s hard on them physiologically to be tagged in this way.

‘In their typical life cycle, they won’t experience daylight, and very rarely will they feel the low pressure, warmer temperatures of surface waters.

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© Provided by Oath Inc. The shark was captured on film (Ocean X)

Typically, the data obtained after surface tagging of a sixgill is believed to be skewed, as the shark does not return to its natural behaviours for some time after the tagging.’

In a blog post, the researchers write, ‘This is historic for a variety of reasons. Now that we’ve proven this method can work for the sixgill, we can unlock the world of leviathan deep-sea dwellers and gain important insights into their movement and behaviour.’

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/techandscience/mysterious-shark-older-than-the-dinosaurs-caught-on-film/ar-AAE27ue?ocid=chromentp

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Shiver...imagine looking around and seeing that big eye looking at you...yipes  :eek:

 

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'Monster' Shark Bigger Than a Submarine Filmed by Scientists As It Tries to Eat Their Gun

Aristos Georgiou

AAFeG7h.img?h=531&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

© OceanX Bluntnose sixgill biting off bait during an OceanX tagging mission.

A team of researchers has captured incredible footage of a close encounter with an ancient species of shark known as the bluntnose sixgill.

The team, led by Dean Grubbs, from Florida State University, were conducting dives in a submersible called "Nadir" as part of an expedition organized by OceanX to tag one of the sharks in their deep-sea environment.

During one of the dives, the team were fortunate to come up close and personal with a huge female bluntnose—=one of the largest sharks in the world—which one of the researchers in the video can be heard describing as "definitely bigger than the sub is long."

The sub crew were left in a state of awe by the encounter: "My goodness that is amazing," one of the team comments, while another can be heard saying, "This is a monster. She is huge." At one point the shark even tries to nibble on the speargun attached to Nadir.

The bluntnose (Hexanchus griseus) is part of an old lineage of sharks that can be traced back 180 million years in the fossil record. In fact, it represents perhaps the oldest living lineage of sharks in the world, the researchers say. They are highly distinctive due to the fact that they have six large conspicuous gill slits, hence the name. Most sharks only have five.

"They have a single dorsal fin that is placed far back on the midline near the tail," Gavin Naylor, one of the scientists on the expedition from the Florida Program for Shark Research at the Florida Museum of Natural History, told Newsweek. "They are reported to grow to over 5 meters [16 feet] long and weigh more than a ton. They are live-bearing. Females can have over 80 pups in a litter. They are likely primarily carrion feeders, but may also take live prey when the opportunity arises. Females are larger than males."

Bluntnose sixgills are distributed across tropical and temperate waters around the world usually living at depths of between 650 and 3,300 feet, although they have been spotted up to 5,000 feet below the surface. However, researchers know very little about this mysterious species. Tagging them could enable scientists to learn more about their biology and behaviour, and protect them from threats.

"Approximately half of all living species of sharks on the planet live their entire lives in the deep sea," Grubbs told Newsweek. "Yet we know virtually nothing about their biology and ecology. Contrast this with the volumes of scientific information on species like white sharks and tiger sharks. Yet as commercial fisheries globally move deeper, deep-sea sharks are being increasingly caught, particularly as bycatch."

"It is often assumed that these deep-sea sharks would die if released," he said. "We began this project in 2005 to begin investigating whether deep-sea sharks caught and brought to the surface survive if released. Since this time we have tagged more than 20 bluntnose sixgill sharks with archiving satellite tags and another 50 with simple identification tags. But all of these were tagged by bringing the sharks to the surface and tagging them alongside the boat or even bringing them onto the deck of the ship."

This tagging revealed to the researchers that nearly all bluntnose six gills survive being caught and brought to the surface. Furthermore, the data showed, intriguingly, that these sharks vertically migrate every day and night.

"At dusk they come up the slope sometimes in the water column to shallower depths where the water temperature is about 62 degrees Fahrenheit, remaining there overnight, and then at dawn, they return to deeper depths where temperatures are 41 degrees Fahrenheit," Grubbs said. "In Exuma Sound [the Bahamas,] this corresponds to coming up to 400-500 meters [1,312-1,640 feet] deep at night and remaining at 900-1200 meters [2,952-3,937 feet] during the day. This is a beautifully consistent vertical pattern the sharks undergo every day."

"However, one of the things we noticed is that across all of these sharks there was an initial period of about two days after tagging where the sharks did not show this pattern and seemed to behave a bit more erratically, and then they settled into that distinct vertical migration every day after that," he said. "We interpreted that erratic phase as a possible recovery period due to short term physiological stress associated with being captured and brought to the surface."

This stress could be enough to temporarily alter this behaviour, even though the sharks seemed to tolerate being brought to the surface. This finding is what led the team to try and tag a bluntnose in the deep-sea instead.

"So how do we test the theory that this initial difference in behaviour represents recovery from capture?" Grubbs said. "We go directly to the sharks in their natural habitat and tag them at depth. This drove our efforts to attempt to tag these sharks at depth. We made three expeditions and many dives spending many hours sitting on the bottom trying to get the sharks to come in and then trying to tag them. We came very close numerous times but never quite had the right shot, or in one case, the shark knocked the spear off the gun and dislodged the tag! But finally, on the last dive on this last expedition [in Exuma Sound,] my colleague Gavin Naylor successfully tagged a sixgill from the sub!"

This tag will remain on the shark for 3 months, before detaching, floating to the surface and uploading the data it has collected via satellite link to a processing centre where it can be analyzed.

"If our theory is correct, we expect to see the same vertical migration behaviour as the other sharks demonstrated but without the initial two days of erratic behaviour," Grubbs said. "Unfortunately, we have to wait impatiently to hear from that tag!"

Currently, the worldwide population of bluntnose sixgills is unknown but they are listed as "Near Threatened" on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List. Nevertheless, the researchers suggest that they are perhaps more common than previously appreciated.

"Finding a six-gill shark at depth turned out to be much less of a challenge than many had imagined," Gaylor said. "They seem reasonably common. Finding a marine biologist willing to go down in a submarine to try to tag a six-gill at depth was the easiest part!"

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/offbeat/monster-shark-bigger-than-a-submarine-filmed-by-scientists-as-it-tries-to-eat-their-gun/ar-AAFfShR

 

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Victor Vescovo: Adventurer reaches deepest ocean locations

VIDEO

download.thumb.png.80159a43be229b296b77377bc9a39839.png

US adventurer Victor Vescovo has become the first person to visit the deepest points in every ocean.

His fifth and final dive in a prototype submersible was made to the bottom of the Arctic's Molloy Trench, some 5.5km (3.4 miles) below the sea surface.

This followed dives during the past 10 months to the floor of the Pacific, Indian, Southern and Atlantic oceans.

The millionaire financier's team also visited the wreck of the Titanic.

All Mr Vescovo's dives were made using the 12-tonne Deep Sea Vehicle (DSV) Limiting Factor, launched and recovered from a dedicated support ship, the DSSV Pressure Drop, ironically a one-time navy submarine hunter.

The last leg of the "Five Deeps Expedition" was concluded on 24 August when the explorer reached a spot known as the Molloy Hole, which is about 275km (170 miles) west of Norway's Svalbard archipelago.

The recorded depth on the solo dive was 5,550m, plus or minus 14m. It is the first time any human has been to this location.

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FULL REPORT

 

Edited by CaaC (John)
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