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Strongest Accent In Your Country

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This should be a complex one for all the Brits.

In Peru, the strongest accent is the Charrapa, or in other words people from the Amazon. I'm not gonna show you though cos it's in Spanish, wouldn't change a thing.

In Canada, Newfoundland has the strongest accent. Probably due to them Irish roots. Listen below. 1:07

 

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Geordies or Scouse I'd say. Northern ones are usually stronger.

But then again you can get tamer accents from those regions and you can actually understand what's being said xD 

Irish can be very strong, too. They barely move their mouths if it's a very thick accent too and you can't even figure out what's being said.

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Probably Queenslanders from Oz.

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11 minutes ago, Harry said:

Probably Queenslanders from Oz.

They do sound a little different 

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Probably Cordobes, or Correntino, or maybe some from the north like Jujeño or Salteño or even Mendocino.

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59 minutes ago, Gunnersauraus said:

@Grizzly21 Brian what is the deal with your new user name. One minute you have an alpaca avatar now you are calling yourself grizzly xD

21 - my age

Grizzly - Grizzly bears are freakin rad

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The accents that stand out the most for me are Geordie or brummy, Soon as you hear somebody with either of those you dont have to ask we're they're from.

Its probably mine though (scouse) Kensington born and bred, no watered down over the water accent 😆

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2 hours ago, Grizzly21 said:

21 - my age

Grizzly - Grizzly bears are freakin rad

You just want to be Candian I imagine. Haha

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Just now, Eco said:

You just want to be Candian I imagine. Haha

Peru is always my #1 choice, but I do have a Canadian passport, so technically I can consider myself that.

I am moving back in June so I'm kind of trying to re-accomodate myself.

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2 minutes ago, Grizzly21 said:

Peru is always my #1 choice, but I do have a Canadian passport, so technically I can consider myself that.

I am moving back in June so I'm kind of trying to re-accomodate myself.

Starting with changing your username? Haha.

Not hating, but Grizzly is such a Candian thing I can't help but laugh.

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5 minutes ago, Eco said:

Starting with changing your username? Haha.

Not hating, but Grizzly is such a Candian thing I can't help but laugh.

Grizzlies are my second favourite type of bear behind Polar bears. However, Polar can mean other things and I wasn't going with that.

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13 hours ago, Grizzly21 said:

21 - my age

Grizzly - Grizzly bears are freakin rad

Looking forward to taytay22 

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Some variations of Welsh are the ones I struggle to understand. Pretty okay with the Geordie/Mackem accent now having lived their for a few years but some people have it stronger than others and it can be difficult.

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On 31/03/2019 at 04:56, Harry said:

Probably Queenslanders from Oz.

 

On 31/03/2019 at 05:07, Toinho said:

They do sound a little different 

Most Australians abroad can easily pick me out for being a Queenslander. Overall, in Australia the basic accent is the same but with varying degrees of thickness. I imagine @Devil-Dick Willie sounds like a first-generation twat; being closer to the western-suburbs Sydney wogs, @Harry like a silver-spooned cunt in the veins of Guy Pearce or Cate Blanchett, and @Toinho like a coked up AFL player.

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On 30/03/2019 at 12:23, Grizzly21 said:

This should be a complex one for all the Brits.

In Peru, the strongest accent is the Charrapa, or in other words people from the Amazon. I'm not gonna show you though cos it's in Spanish, wouldn't change a thing.

In Canada, Newfoundland has the strongest accent. Probably due to them Irish roots. Listen below. 1:07

 

Canada's is more Scottish than anything else.

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Probably a proper Glasgow accent would be the most difficult to understand in Scotland for most people. And even my fairly mild Glasgow accent can be hard for foreigners to understand. 

But it gets difficult to classify depending on what you count as an accent or as a dialect, for example I would find a person speaking Doric or Lowland Scots harder to understand than a fellow Glaswegian (though I could still manage it), but typically those two would be counted as dialects or even languages. The way people speak in Glasgow is more of a modern development and so gets counted as an accent more than a dialect.

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I feel like a lot of people would probably say Scouse accents. But I disagree because I grew up with them, so I think they're normal and everyone else talks funny - not us.

So I'd probably go with @UNORTHODOX's answer - Brummies and Geordies

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Limburg for sure. If it's for the entire language area, it has to be one of those weird Flemish accents that I literally cannot understand a word of.

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In Germany probably "Sächsisch" which you speak in Saxony. Still prefer to hear that over "Schwäbich" which you speak in most parts of Baden Wuerttemberg. It's outright disgusting. 

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1 minute ago, Tommy said:

In Germany probably "Sächsisch" which you speak in Saxony. Still prefer to hear that over "Schwäbich" which you speak in most parts of Baden Wuerttemberg. It's outright disgusting. 

I have a soft spot for Sächsisch as my dad is originally from there and the only remaining family from his side still lives in Sachsen too. Schwäbisch is weird but I honestly don't find any accent/dialect disgusting. I think it's just funny :D I also love Austrian German :D Swiss German not so much.

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On ‎31‎/‎03‎/‎2019 at 07:14, The Rebel CRS said:

I remember hearing myself on camera when I was a kid and I used to have broad Hull accent (different from Kez's south Yorkshire twang) but it's pretty much gone now.

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16 minutes ago, The Artful Dodger said:

I remember hearing myself on camera when I was a kid and I used to have broad Hull accent (different from Kez's south Yorkshire twang) but it's pretty much gone now.

Why’d it change? That is pretty unusual.

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47 minutes ago, nudge said:

I have a soft spot for Sächsisch as my dad is originally from there and the only remaining family from his side still lives in Sachsen too. Schwäbisch is weird but I honestly don't find any accent/dialect disgusting. I think it's just funny :D I also love Austrian German :D Swiss German not so much.

Don’t Austrians and Bavarians sound similar? Anyway I recall an anecdote that a German production company wouldn’t let Schwarzenegger dub his own film because they claimed he sounded like ‘an Austrian farmer’

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21 minutes ago, Spike said:

Don’t Austrians and Bavarians sound similar? Anyway I recall an anecdote that a German production company wouldn’t let Schwarzenegger dub his own film because they claimed he sounded like ‘an Austrian farmer’

Pretty similar, depending on the region, but both Bairisch and Austrian German have several regional dialects of their own that sound quite different from each other too!

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Austrians also have some completely different words for some things. 

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When I was a kid I grew up with an accent similar to David's (Kes) but after joining the BBC in 1955 I was 'groomed' to sit with headphones on in front of a microphone and lose the accent - once it had been controlled I was given the job and ended up doing anything from Top 20 to reading the NEWS in a 'posh' BBC accent.  These days - after spending lots of time in Tommy's part of the world I find that if I use my German on holiday, the real Germans seem to think I am from the Ruhr rather than England - ne! (that seems to be a giveaway bit at the end of the sentence)  I still find the Scottish accent - particularly Glaswegian or Saltcoats area hard to follow as they always seem to want to change all the vowels in the words (24 hours makes a dee there!) Ms Sturgeon can be particularly hard to follow.  My time in Beziers in the south of France taught me that they cannot understand anyone from Calais and when my friend from there was elected to represent them in Paris he often came home having been ignored - not due to speaking rubbish, but they simply couldn't understand him. My favourite pastime as a kid was chucking maccas.  Nowadays it is sometimes used after throwing away a McGarbage burger but then we simply threw stones at each other.  The Welsh are passionate about holding on to their language as are many in the South of Germany and Austria as it sometimes seems like another land.  When Ivan Rakitic came to the Ruhr from Switzerland he and I spent time trying to sort out the difference between his and Manuel's version of German, but respecting each other's weird sounds helped not only to sort out what was meant, but for future interviews - German, Spanish and English for him was a big help as it was for all the kids.  When Mesut was asked why he was spending time in English Conversation classes his response was to the effect that he wanted to be a footballer and play in England (although Bennie Howedes suggested he learned German first!!). His recent interviews have  made it all worthwhile so embrace the differences.  Smile at the pronunciation if you wish, but accept that if they sound strange to you, your voice may be just as strange to them.  Interesting to read the different responses above - only sorry I can't actually hear them.

One final thought - our get together in Duisburg with Tommy, livabird, Relling, Jessie and others had no problems.  English with a German Accent, German with a Polish or Norwegian accent and Thea's strong South east accent all made for a great visit and all understood each other so accents are no real problem using that as an example - even Jesse's Dutch was single rather than double..........

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2 hours ago, The Artful Dodger said:

I remember hearing myself on camera when I was a kid and I used to have broad Hull accent (different from Kez's south Yorkshire twang) but it's pretty much gone now.

Grimsby doesn't have a massively strong accent but I lost mine when I moved to Sunderland for Uni. Came back with a weird hybrid but now I think I'm back to a softer more well-spoken variant of the Grimsby accent.

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My accent is weird. I have fluent-native spanish but when I speak I have a gringo tone. When I speak English though, you can tell I came from South America. Just things of living between Peru and Canada really.

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